Yahoo! News : International (25)

What US response to Jerusalem crisis says about Trump-era Mideast diplomacy

Once again, a cycle of deadly violence between Israelis and Palestinians – this time sparked by recent events at Jerusalem's holiest of religious sites – poisoned already strained relations between the two populations and threatened to drag neighbors into the storm. As tensions spiraled and ...

A tipping point for Washington's investigative culture?

Many members of Congress were furious. It was 1792, and a military campaign led by General Arthur St. Clair against Native Americans in what is today Ohio had ended in complete disaster. President George Washington responded with wary cooperation, aware he was setting precedents for presidents to ...

What restores peace for Jerusalem's Old City

In most religions, sacred shrines are meant to remind the faithful of the promise of peace. A series of killings, which began at the Temple Mount on July 14, set off the worst violence between Israelis and Palestinians in years. The potential of a major conflict forced emergency intervention by the ...

Boomer parents: 'One day, this will all be yours.' Grown children: 'Noooo!'

Two hundred stuffed animals, two violins, and a 7-1/2 foot-tall Christmas tree: That was just a corner of the possessions Rosalie and Bill Kelleher accumulated over their 47-year marriage. Among the possessions the Kellehers are keeping are three hutches – one that belonged to his mother, one that ...

Madagascar skirted famine – barely. Now, it's boosting resilience before drought returns.

Battered by drought and civil wars, more than 20 million people from Yemen to Tanzania are at risk of starvation in what aid workers call the largest humanitarian crisis since World War II. But over the past two decades, nations that once produced searing images of famine's toll have moved to thwart ...

On Russia, Congress shows remarkable unity

The Russia controversy – one of the most defining issues of Donald Trump's young presidency – has been cast by the president and his supporters as a political witch hunt,' even while Democrats are all over the news talk shows raising serious questions. In fact, observers say this Congress is ...

In Ethiopia, model drought defenses are put to the test

Battered by drought and civil wars, more than 20 million people from Yemen to Tanzania are at risk of starvation in what aid workers call the largest humanitarian crisis since World War II. But over the past two decades, nations that once produced searing images of famine's toll have moved to thwart ...

Hot new job for middle-class students: manual labor

Hunched over their workspaces in a dusty, sunlit room in the North Bennett Street School in Boston's North End, Jim Reid-Cunningham's bookbinding workshop seems grateful for an interruption. It's like getting behind in the pitch count in baseball,' Mr. Reid-Cunningham says. North Bennett Street ...

The bounty that heads off famine

With more than 20 million people at risk of famine, or what is called the worst humanitarian crisis since World War II, a Monitor series this week looks at some of the successes in avoiding famine. More deeply, the articles probe what it means to build resilience' among people in dealing with a ...

How do refugee students make the jump to Germany's universities?

Mohamad Taqi Sohrabi has had to fight for an education his entire life. An Afghan refugee born in Iran, Mr. Sohrabi says it wasn't easy for him to go to school. Sohrabi was eventually able to study English translation at a university outside Tehran for four semesters, but as an Afghan in Iran, ...

Trump's Putin meeting showed his naiveté, Trump-Putin's meeting was overhyped, Why Donald Trump Jr.'s handling of Russian lawyer meeting makes things worse, Has China lost its grip on Hong Kong youth?, After Mosul, Islamic State remains a threat

The meeting between US president Donald Trump and Russian president Vladimir Putin at the G20 summit ... confirmed the expected naivete of the American president. I did not know whether to laugh or cry when Trump and Putin announced they wanted to set up a cyber security unit, so that ...

Readers write: Mealtime memories, prisoner empathy, violence and children

Recommended: Could you pass a US citizenship test? Thank you for your June 12 cover story, The story of prisoner 5770102414.' Being a published writer, activist, and advocate against the mistreatment of prisoners, I could only empathize with Prontip Mankong. As the mother of a 5-year-old, I want to ...

A disrupter at UN: Can new chief shake up bureaucracy to speed progress?

António Guterres, who took over as United Nations secretary-general early this year, acknowledges that the world community has made encouraging progress in improving people's lives over recent decades. Just two examples: Malaysia reduced poverty levels from about half the population in 1970 to ...

Why there's a growing rift in GOP over law and order

Should the government be able to take your money, car, or home without charging you with a crime? For Attorney General Jeff Sessions, a careful' plan to expand the program amounts to a common-sense approach to support law enforcement and weaken criminal enterprises amid an uptick in violent crime. ...

Poland's challenge to EU values

Poland's government, elected in 2015 with 38 percent of the vote, appears to be on a collision course with the European Union. In fact, the EU has few tools to punish Poland. One of the EU's great triumphs is the spread of the idea that people should be treated equally before the law.

For homeless girls in Queens, Girl Scout Troop 6000 offers an anchor

When New York City Council Member Jimmy Van Bramer attended the first meeting of Girl Scout Troop 6000 in his district in western Queens this year, he hadn't the slightest inkling that the small group of girls gathering here would have such an impact. As the first Girl Scout troop in New York ...

She arrived in Senegal 43 years ago – and is still there working on social issues

Two dozen men and women sit in a circle at a training center an hour's drive from Dakar, the capital of Senegal. Molly Melching, a warm American in her 60s who is Tostan's founder and chief executive officer, listens attentively as participants share what they've learned. With support from the ...

Presidential persuasion: So far, the art eludes Trump

Until this week Mr. Trump has been largely uninvolved in twisting arms and bending ears in an effort to win passage of the bill. In recent days Trump has thrown himself into lobbying for a health-care win,' but his message has at times contradicted itself, while the bill teeters on the edge of ...

How Western spyware is being used to shut down Arab rights activists

For veteran observers in the Middle East, the revelation that the UAE may have hacked Qatar's news agency, precipitating a diplomatic crisis, reads like the rejected plot for a spy novel. Since the so-called Arab Spring erupted seven years ago, Arab governments and intelligence agencies have spent ...

Curiosity as an answer for income inequality

The closer that economists look at the rise in income inequality, the more they find one cause may be the rise of another inequality: The least productive firms are falling further behind the most productive firms. This point was made in a recent study spanning 16 countries by the Paris-based ...

GOP challenge: Reforming widely accepted 'safety net' programs

The failure of Senate Republicans to close ranks on health-care reform this week put on display an old* challenge: How conservatives can reform social safety-net programs when there's a growing acceptance of them – even among Republican voters. Chastened, some GOP lawmakers are talking about ...

Why the ground shifts under Venezuela's regime

A defining moment in a democratic revolution often comes when a nation's poor, who mostly focus on daily material needs, join others in demanding basic rights and uncorrupted governance. The Trump administration, for example, promises stiff sanctions if President Nicolás Maduro goes ahead with a ...

How cities are helping former felons get stable housing

Six months after Ronald Doyle's wife died, he got a call from a public housing officer. When Doyle got out of jail in 1991 after serving eight years, he had nowhere to go. Public housing wasn't an option for a felon like Doyle, so he drifted between addresses.

Europe's female imams challenge Muslim patriarchy – and fight Islamophobia

Sherin Khankan flits about the window sills, lighting wicks and placing bouquets of roses in just the right places as she prepares for Friday prayers. We being women, there is always a lot of candles and flowers,' explains Denmark's first female imam, placing a single, deep pink rose in a potted ...

Health care: The promise, and the perils, of bipartisanship

Last week, when Republican senators unveiled their revised health-care plan, reporters swamped Sen. Susan Collins of Maine, a crucial swing vote, pinning her against a wall just steps from the Capitol's magnificent rotunda. Inching her way forward, reporters flowing along like flotsam and jetsam, ...