Wall Street Journal : US (130)

Texas Congressman Apologizes After Nude Photo Circulates on Internet

Rep. Joe Barton apologized to his constituents for not using better judgment in his personal life, after a nude photo of him circulated on the internet this week.

Texas Congressman Apologizes After Nude Photo Circulates on Internet

Rep. Joe Barton apologized to his constituents on Wednesday for not using better judgment in his personal life, after a nude photo of him circulated on the internet this week.

Why We Need the Ritual of Holiday Meals

Holidays are now the only time of year when we really focus on what and how we eat,and that is a source of security.

Who Picks Up the Tab for Thanksgiving Day Leaps and Twirls?

It may not be Broadway. But for 1,200 girls, and a few boys, who came to dance and flash pompoms, performing at the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade is close enough.

28 More Rules of Thanksgiving Family Touch Football

A Journal tradition is back. Jason Gay offers a new round of Thanksgiving Family Touch Football rules.

Trump Administration to Tap Political Science Professor for Census Post

The Trump administration plans to pick Thomas Brunell, a Texas political science professor, as the new deputy director of the U.S. Census Bureau, to help manage the day-to-day operations of the agency.

Trump Signals Support for Roy Moore Over Democratic Opponent

President Donald Trump indicated he wanted to see Republican Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore elected despite allegations of sexual misconduct, citing the significance of maintaining the GOP's slender majority in the chamber.

Tax Bill's Fine Print: Making It Tougher for Cities, States to Refinance Debt

Cities and states across the U.S. are warily bracing for the elimination of the tax exemption on certain bonds they rely on to refinance old bonds.

Trump Signals Support for Roy Moore Over Democratic Opponent

President Donald Trump indicated he wanted to see Republican Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore elected despite allegations of sexual misconduct, citing the significance of maintaining GOP's slender majority in the chamber.

With Tax-Plan Push, Hatch Faces a Deal-Making Test

Utah Sen. Orrin Hatch faces some of the biggest challenges as he ushers the Republican plan to overhaul the U.S. tax code through the Senate Finance Committee that he chairs.

In the Name of Airplane Safety, Researchers Set Out on a Wild Goose Chase

Researchers in Chicago are stepping up their effort to tag wild geese in the city's Marquette Park, near Midway International Airport, with plans to start chasing them out of the airport's surroundings, where they are less dangerous to planes.

Harvard Faces DOJ Probe Over Affirmative-Action Policies

The U.S. Department of Justice has opened an investigation into the use of race in Harvard University's admissions practices and has accused the university of failing to cooperate with the probe, according to documents reviewed by The Wall Street Journal.

Home Sales Remained Sluggish in October

Existing-home sales increased 2% in October from a month earlier to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.48 million, but sales dipped 0.9% from a year earlier, the second consecutive decline on an annual basis.

FCC Plans to End Net Neutrality in Win for Cable, Wireless Firms

Federal regulators outlined plans for dismantling Obama-era rules requiring equal internet access, clearing the way for service providers to offer new options and creative pricing.

U.S. Sues to Block AT&T Merger

The Justice Department filed a lawsuit challenging AT&T's proposed acquisition of Time Warner, alleging the combination of the two companies poses an unlawful threat to competition that could raise prices and slow innovation.

Weary With Violence, Baltimore Residents Fight Back

As Baltimore nears the end of an especially violent year, local activists are fighting back, holdings events like a citywide ceasefire to try to stem the gang-related gun homicides.

Justice Department Asks Supreme Court to Fully Reinstate Travel Ban

The Justice Department asked the Supreme Court to fully reinstate its travel restrictions on residents of six Muslim-majority countries, the latest move in a legal battle that has raged since the Trump administration's first days.

Prosecutors Charge Iranian National in HBO Hack

Federal prosecutors unsealed charges against an Iranian national Tuesday, accusing him of hacking into HBO's computer network, stealing unreleased scripts of “Game of Thrones” and then threatening to leak them publicly.

Existing-Home Sales Rise 2.0% in October

Sales of previously-owned homes grew robustly in October, as home sales continued to rebound in recently hurricane-ravaged markets.

With Tax-Plan Push, Orrin Hatch Faces a Deal-Making Test

Utah Sen. Orrin Hatch faces some of the biggest challenges as he ushers the Republican plan to overhaul the U.S. tax code through the Senate Finance Committee that he chairs.

Pence PAC Steers Funds to Dozens of GOP Candidates

Vice President Mike Pence will dip into his new political-action committee to help Republicans keep control of Congress and statehouses, contributing more than $200,000 to candidates in dozens of races across the country, his office said.

U.S. Files Lawsuit Challenging AT&T-Time Warner Deal

The Justice Department filed a lawsuit Monday challenging AT&T's proposed acquisition of Time Warner, alleging the combination of the two companies poses an unlawful threat to competition that could raise prices and slow innovation.

Nebraska Regulators Approve Keystone XL Pipeline

Nebraska officials approved the Keystone XL pipeline, removing the last major regulatory hurdle, though the future of the long-delayed project remains far from certain.

Justice Department Asks Supreme Court to Fully Reinstate Travel Ban

The Justice Department asked the Supreme Court on Monday to fully reinstate its travel restrictions on residents of six Muslim-majority countries, the latest move in a legal battle over entry to the U.S. that has raged since the Trump administration's first days.

Trump Administration Ends Protections for Haitians

The Trump administration is ending a humanitarian program for tens of thousands of Haitians living in the U.S., but will give those immigrants more than a year to leave.

Trump Foundation Got Big Boost From Veterans Event

President Donald Trump's charitable foundation saw a sharp increase in fundraising in the year he was elected, largely stemming from a fundraiser he held for veterans groups

Puerto Rico Grid Contractor Suspends Work Over Missed Payments

The company hired to repair Puerto Rico's electrical grid stopped working Monday over $83 million in unpaid bills while some utility crews from the mainland U.S. quit the half-finished reconstruction job altogether.

FCC to Outline Plan to Roll Back Rules on Net Neutrality

Regulators are expected to unveil plans for reversing rules that require internet service providers to treat all web traffic equally, a move that could reshape the internet economy and consumers' online experience.

Yellen to Leave Fed Board When New Chief Takes Over

Federal Reserve Chairwoman Janet Yellen said she would resign as a member of the Fed's board of governors once her successor as chairman has been sworn in.

Limits on Trump's Power to Shape Courts Fall Away

The Republican head of the Senate Judiciary Committee has curtailed one of the last legislative limits on a president's power to shape the federal courts, giving Donald Trump more freedom to install his judges of choice.

Fight Against Sexual Harassment Moves to Statehouses

Allegations of sexual misconduct by lawmakers in at least a dozen states have prompted investigations, some changes in reporting and investigation protocols, and partial suspensions of several state legislators.

Veterans Affairs Chief Wants Bigger Role for Private Health Care

David Shulkin said he wants to make the VA's hospital system compete with private-sector providers for military veteran customers, which he said would give veterans greater choice over their health care.

Charles Manson, Convicted Killer and 1960s Cult Leader, Dies

Charles Manson, the convicted killer and cult leader who persuaded his young followers to commit a string of murders in 1969, has died.

After Decade of Delays, Keystone XL Nears Approval

Nebraska officials are set to decide whether to green-light the Keystone XL pipeline, the last major regulatory approval standing in the way of the long-delayed project.

The Varied---and Global---Threats Confronting Democracy

Beyond the U.S. investigations into possible Russian collusion with the Trump campaign, there are broader threats to democracy around the globe, Gerald F. Seib writes.

Trump Administration Tightens Scrutiny of Skilled Worker Visa Applicants

The Trump administration is adding hurdles and increasing scrutiny in the employment-visa application process, making it harder for businesses to hire foreign workers, and companies and immigration attorneys are bracing for more changes soon.

Border Patrol Agent Killed in Texas

A U.S. Border Patrol agent died after being fatally injured while on patrol in the Big Bend Sector in Texas.

In Tour of House Districts, Democrats Listen for a Message

Rep. Steny Hoyer, the No. 2 House Democrat, is visiting districts his party hopes to carry in 2018 with an aim to craft a message that resonates with voters only marginally attached to the party's base of support along the coasts.

Key GOP Senator Cites Concerns Over Senate Tax Bill

Sen. Susan Collins on Sunday recited a list of concerns she had with the Republican tax bill barreling through the Senate, raising pressure on the party's leadership to slow its progress and make changes to secure passage.

Trump Says He Should Have Left UCLA Players in Chinese Jail

Donald Trump tweeted he should have left three college basketball players in a Chinese jail, after the father of one of the players minimized the president's role in securing their release.

Ex-Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew Joins Private-Equity Firm

Former Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew is joining Lindsay Goldberg LLC, a midmarket New York private-equity firm, adding his name to the long list of high-ranking government officials entering the sector in recent years.

Roy Moore Is Relying on Evangelical Christians to Keep Campaign Afloat

As allegations of sexual misconduct have mounted against Roy Moore and Republican leaders have urged him to end his run for U.S. Senate in Alabama, Mr. Moore is relying on his most loyal constituency to keep his campaign afloat: evangelical Christians.

Vice President Pence on Taxes and Trade

Mike Pence says the administration thinks they have the votes for tax reform,and offers a defense of the president's leadership qualities.

John Ferriola on Trump's Relationship With Business

The Nucor chief says the president is engaged with manufacturers.

When Private Property Rights Collide With Public Goals

Bobby Ben-Simon and his wife are seeking to reverse the landmark designation that the Historic Preservation Commission of White Plains issued for a property they had acquired.

Suit: N.Y. Ignored Sex-Harassment Claims Against Ex-Cuomo Aide

A New York state government employee has filed suit alleging she was sexually assaulted by a former high-ranking state economic-development aide and that Gov. Andrew Cuomo's office ignored her complaints.

Two Months After Maria, Puerto Rico's Health System Struggles to Meet Needs

Puerto Rico's lengthy recovery from Hurricane Maria has created an urgent medical need in rural towns across the island, where some residents have gone without medication or primary care for weeks, say medical volunteers and relief workers.

Trump Administration Ramps Up Dispute Over Sanctuary Policies

The Trump administration is expanding its immigration dispute with local officials across the country, warning 29 additional city, county and state governments that they may be violating a law requiring them to share certain immigration information with federal authorities.

'Gucci' Lobbyists From '86 Tax Revamp Are Gone. Now They Use Gchat

Liberated by the ability to email, text and Gchat lawmakers and aides, the lobbyists who swarmed Capitol Hill from 1985 to 1986, no longer have to physically be present as the House and Senate speed through a sweeping rewrite of the tax code.

An Apparent Suicide and Alleged Witness Intimidation, as Soccer Goes on Trial

Companies across the globe have been accused of taking bribes, and a former lawyer apparently took his own life, as a case alleging corruption in high-stakes soccer gets under way in Brooklyn.