University of Cambridge (13)

Ancient fish scales and vertebrate teeth share an embryonic origin

In biology, one long-running debate has teeth: whether ancient fish scales moved into the mouth with the origin of jaws, or if the tooth had its own evolutionary inception. Recent studies on species such as zebrafish showed scales and teeth developing from distinctly different clusters of cells in ...

The beauty of engineering

The competition, sponsored by ZEISS , international leaders in the fields of optics and optoelectronics, has been held annually for the last 13 years. See more of this year's winners here.  Crystal tigers, metal peacock feathers and a 'nano man' are just some of the striking images featured in ...

‘Mini liver tumours’ created in a dish for the first time

Primary liver cancer is the second most lethal cancer worldwide. To better understand the biology of the disease and develop potential treatments, researchers need models that can grow in the lab and accurately reflect how the tumours behave in patients. Previously, cultures of cells had been used ...

Keyhole surgery more effective than open surgery for ruptured aneurysm

This is the first randomised trial comparing the use of keyhole aneurysm repair versus traditional open surgery to repair ruptured aneurysm, with full midterm follow-up. Abdominal aortic aneurysm is a swelling of the aorta – the main blood vessel that leads away from the heart, down through the ...

Opinion: What can we learn about you from just one click?

Whether you like it or not, almost every step you take online is recorded: the websites you visit, the purchases you make, the songs you listen to, the messages you post or read on social sites, and the pages you follow on Facebook. These digital footprints provide a treasure trove of data that can ...

Opinion: What makes the Cambridge cluster special?

More than 60,000 people are employed in the so-called ‘Cambridge cluster’ of companies, and in excess of £12 billion in turnover is generated annually by the 4,700 knowledge-intensive firms in and around the city. The innovation that underpins the cluster is impressive – the city ...

Children with disabilities are being denied equal opportunities for a quality education across the world, including in the UK

Countries, with both developed and developing economies, need to do more to ensure that children with disabilities not only access education, but also benefit from quality education. In England, while children with special educational needs and disabilities access school, multiple concerns have been ...

Archaeologists uncover rare 2,000-year-old sundial during Roman theatre excavation

Not only has the sundial survived largely undamaged for more than two millennia, but the presence of two Latin texts means researchers from the University of Cambridge have been able to glean precise information about the man who commissioned it. The sundial was found lying face down by students of ...

Fully integrated circuits printed directly onto fabric

The researchers, from the University of Cambridge, working with colleagues in Italy and China, have demonstrated how graphene – a two-dimensional form of carbon – can be directly printed onto fabric to produce integrated electronic circuits which are comfortable to wear and can survive up ...

Sheep are able to recognise human faces from photographs

Sheep can be trained to recognise human faces from photographic portraits – and can even identify the picture of their handler without prior training – according to new research from scientists at the University of Cambridge. The study, published today in the journal Royal Society: Open ...

Height and weight evolved at different speeds in the bodies of our ancestors

A wide-ranging new study of fossils spanning over four million years suggests that stature and body mass advanced at different speeds during the evolution of hominins – the ancestral lineage of which Homo sapiens alone still exist. Published today in the journal Royal Society: Open Science, the ...

Cambridge expert jointly leads international push to reduce global burden of traumatic brain injury

The Commission has been co-led by Professor David Menon from the Division of Anaesthesia at the University of Cambridge together with Professor Andrew Maas from Antwerp University Hospital and University of Antwerp, Belgium. The Commission is being launched today at the European Parliament and ...

Périgord black truffle cultivated in the UK for the first time

Researchers from the University of Cambridge and Mycorrhizal Systems Ltd have confirmed that a black truffle has been successfully cultivated in the UK for the first time: the farthest north that the species has ever been found. It was grown as part of a programme in Monmouthshire, South Wales, run ...