PhysOrg (444)

Ochre use by Middle Stone Age humans in Porc-Epic cave persisted over thousands of years

Middle Stone Age humans in the Porc-Epic cave likely used ochre over at least 4,500 years, according to a study published May 24, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Daniela Rosso from the University of Barcelona, Spain, and the University of Bordeaux, France, and colleagues.

Groundbreaking discovery of early human life in ancient Peru

A-tisket, A-tasket. You can tell a lot from a basket. Especially if it comes from the ruins of an ancient civilization inhabited by humans nearly 15,000 years ago during the Late Pleistocene and Early Holocene ages.

Shedding light on how humans walk... with robots

Learning how to walk is difficult for toddlers to master; it's even harder for adults who are recovering from a stroke, traumatic brain injury, or other condition, requiring months of intensive, often frustrating physical therapy. With the recent boom of the robotic exoskeleton industry, more and ...

Some grizzly bears appear to target railways for foraging in Canadian national parks

Spilled grain, rail-killed ungulates, and the effects on other species of increased light and warmth may all attract grizzly bears to forage along railways in Canada's mountain parks, which could increase their risk of being hit by trains, according to a study published May 24, 2017 in the ...

Need cash? Facebook expands personal fundraising tools

Facebook is expanding its fundraising tools that let users ask friends and strangers to give them money to help pay for education, medical or other expenses.

Scientists capture the first cryo-EM images of cellular target for type 2 diabetes in action

Researchers at the University of Michigan, Stanford University and biotech company ConfometRx have captured the first cryo-electron microscopy snapshots of a key cellular receptor in action.

Discovered: Fast-growing galaxies from early universe

A team of astronomers including Carnegie's Eduardo Bañados and led by Roberto Decarli of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy has discovered a new kind of galaxy which, although extremely old—formed less than a billion years after the Big Bang—creates stars more than a hundred times ...

Where you grow what you grow: Camelina's varied response to location

Camelina: Have you heard of it? It's an emerging alternative oilseed crop in parts of the Great Plains.

Crash report: Confused by spin, Mars probe failed to brake

An independent report has concluded that Europe's Schiaparelli probe crash-landed on Mars last year because its systems couldn't cope with a brief, wild rotation during its descent.

Are wolverines in the Arctic in the climate change crosshairs?

Will reductions in Arctic snow cover make tundra-dwelling wolverines more vulnerable to climate change than previously thought?

Scientists find simple copper complex shuts down botulinum neurotoxin poisoning

Botulinum neurotoxin is probably best known to Americans as BOTOX, a cosmetic medicine, rather than as a cause of potentially dangerous foodborne illnesses. Lesser known is that Clostridium botulinum, the bacterium that causes the neurointoxication, produces one of the most potent toxins on earth ...

Hyundai Ioniq: 2017's top fuel-efficient gas-electric hybrid

The 2017 Ioniq Hybrid is Hyundai's fuel-efficient challenger to the Toyota Prius, America's best-selling gasoline-electric hybrid.

Religious devotion as predictor of behavior

Robert Lynch, a postdoctoral fellow in anthropology, says the level of devotion one feels toward religious beliefs can predict how that person likely will interact with members of his own group or with members outside of the group. Lynch's latest research paper, "Religious Devotion and Extrinsic ...

Chemical Safety Board faces uncertain future

Under President Donald Trump's proposed 2018 budget, the world's only independent body dedicated to investigating chemical-related industrial accidents would be abolished. A story in Chemical & Engineering News , the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, revisits why the U.S. ...

Fossil beetles suggest that LA climate has been relatively stable for 50,000 years

Research based on more than 180 fossil insects preserved in the La Brea Tar Pits of Los Angeles indicate that the climate in what is now southern California has been relatively stable over the past 50,000 years.

Half of mayoral elections in six US states are unopposed

Approximately half of mayoral elections in six U.S. states are unopposed, and unopposed elections are on the rise, according to a report from the Center for Local Elections in American Politics , part of Rice University's Kinder Institute for Urban Research.

Border walls may pose big challenges to biodiversity—but smaller ones to humans

With the prospect of a US-Mexico border wall looming, research and reporting on the ecological impacts of walls is both important and timely. Reporting in BioScience on such barriers' known effects on wildlife, science journalist Lesley Evans Ogden describes the potential effects of the proposed ...

What bone proteomics could reveal about the dead

Studying bones has helped scientists reconstruct what dinosaurs and other extinct creatures looked like. Taking this further, scientists recently started identifying proteins from bones to glean more information about remains. But one team has found that the reliability of this approach can depend ...

Change at work linked to employee stress, distrust and intent to quit, new survey finds

At a time of change and uncertainty across the country, American adults who have been affected by change at work are more likely to report chronic work stress, less likely to trust their employer and more likely to say they plan to leave the organization within the next year compared with those who ...

Volunteers help astronomers find star that exploded 970 million years ago, predating the dinosaurs

Online volunteers, including a woman from Belgium and a Scottish man, have helped astronomers at The Australian National University find a star that exploded 970 million years ago, predating the dinosaurs' time on Earth.

Neutrons provide the first nanoscale look at a living cell membrane

A research team from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has performed the first-ever direct nanoscale examination of a living cell membrane. In doing so, it also resolved a long-standing debate by identifying tiny groupings of lipid molecules that are likely key to the cell's ...

Three-dimensional graphene: Experiment at BESSY II shows that optical properties are tuneable

An international research team has for the first time investigated the optical properties of three-dimensional nanoporous graphene at the IRIS infrared beamline of the BESSY II electron storage ring. The experiments show that the plasmonic excitations in this new material can be precisely controlled ...

Sorghum: Health food, sweetener and now, clothing dye

Sorghum has long been a staple food in many parts of the world, but in the U.S., it's best known as a sweetener and livestock feed. As demand for the grain soars, so does the amount of waste husks. To reduce this waste, scientists report in the journal ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering a new ...

Paper test strip could help heart failure patients monitor their condition at home

Contrary to the condition's name, heart failure doesn't mean the heart has stopped pumping—it's just not working at full strength. It can often be managed with medications and lifestyle changes, but its progression needs to be monitored closely. Now scientists have developed a new test strip ...

LA lawns lose lots of water: 70B gallons a year

In summer 2010, Los Angeles was losing about 100 gallons of water per person per day to the atmosphere through the evaporation and plant uptake of lawns and trees. Lawns accounted for 70 percent of the water loss, while trees accounted for 30 percent, according to a University of Utah study ...

Researchers develop molecule that may lead to first synthetic one-dose antimalarial

Researchers at LSTM, working in partnership with the University of Liverpool and other colleagues, have developed a molecule which has the potential to become the first fully synthetic, one-dose treatment for malaria.

Researchers combine two advanced fluorescence microscopy techniques

Is it possible to watch at the level of single cells how fish embryos become trout, carp or salmon? Researchers at Goethe University Frankfurt have successfully combined two very advanced fluorescence microscopy techniques. The new high-resolution light microscope permits fascinating insights into a ...

China blocks online broadcast of computer go match

Internet users outside China watched a computer defeat its national go champion, but few Chinese web surfers could see it.

Qatar begins probe after state news agency hacked

Qatar said Wednesday it had begun an inquiry into an unprecedented security breach by hackers who posted fake news stories attributed to its ruler on highly sensitive regional political issues.

A new method for creating safer induced pluripotent stem cells

Induced pluripotent stem cells hold great promise in regenerative medicine, personalized medicine and drug discovery. However, while avoiding the ethical controversies associated with embryonic stem cells, they carry neoplastic risk owing to the use of the oncogenes c-Myc and Lin28. This has limited ...

Neuromechanics of flamingos' amazing feats of balance

If you've watched flamingos at the zoo – or if you're lucky, in the wild – you've likely wondered how flamingos manage to sleep standing on one leg.

Study uncovers widespread leak risk for US underground natural gas storage wells

With the average well built in 1963, more than 1 in 5 active US underground natural gas storage wells could be vulnerable to leaks due to obsolete well designs, according to a new study from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

New theory describes liquid droplet behavior on solid surfaces

Japanese researchers have succeeded in deriving a theoretical formula that quantitatively predicts the wetting and spreading behavior of droplets that collide with the flat surface of a solid material. Although the behavior of droplets colliding with a solid surface looks simple superficially, it is ...

A fresh look inside the protein nano-machines

Proteins digest food, and fight infections and cancer, and serve other metabolic functions. They are basically nano-machines, each one designed to perform a specific task. But how did they evolve to match those needs, and how did genes encode the structure and function of proteins? Researchers from ...

Stingless bees have specialized guards to defend their colonies, study reveals

Like ants and termites, several species of stingless bees have specialized guards or soldiers to defend their colonies from attacks by natural enemies.

How to obtain highly crystalline organic-inorganic perovskite films for solar cells

Members of the Laboratory of New Materials for Solar Energetics, working at the Faculty of Material Sciences, in cooperation with their colleagues from the Faculty of Chemistry of the Lomonosov Moscow State University have obtained highly crystalline organic-inorganic perovskite films for solar ...

Water is surprisingly ordered on the nanoscale

Nanometric-sized water drops are everywhere—in the air as droplets or aerosols, in industrially produced medications, and within rocks and oil fields. To understand the behavior of these drops, it is necessary to know how they interact with their hydrophobic environment. This interaction takes ...

Secret weapon of smart bacteria tracked to 'sweet tooth'

Researchers have figured out how a once-defeated bacterium has re-emerged to infect cotton in a battle that could sour much of the Texas and U.S. crop.

Revealed: How polyomavirus tricks our cells into helping it build its invasion route

Every cell in our body runs like a tiny factory that makes specialized products, using the carefully guarded instructions kept in the CEO's office.

Newly-published spinach genome will make more than Popeye stronger

"I'm strong to the finich, 'cause I eats me spinach!" said Popeye the Sailor Man.

China shuts some live streaming sites, punishes companies

Chinese authorities have punished dozens of companies involved in live online broadcasting and shut down 10 platforms for showing content that was pornographic, related to gambling or involved content considered superstitious and harmful to minors.

Research explores 'artificial leaf' system for solar fuel production

If human beings could mimic the way plants make their own fuel, it's not a stretch to say that Earth's energy needs could be solved.

Mouse sperm survives in space, but could human babies?

Freeze-dried mouse sperm that spent nine months in space has been used to produce healthy rodent offspring back on Earth, Japanese researchers said this week.

Four climbers found dead on Everest

The bodies of four climbers were found inside a tent on Everest, an expedition organiser said Wednesday, taking the death toll on the world's highest peak this spring season to 10.

Jump in renewable energy jobs worldwide: agency

The renewable energy sector employed 9.8 million people worldwide in 2016, almost twice as many as in 2012, the Abu Dhabi-based International Renewable Energy Agency said on Wednesday.

Alaska aquiver: State hosts plate tectonics research effort

Alaska averages 40,000 earthquakes per year, with more large quakes than the other 49 states combined, and America's shakiest state is about to have its ground examined like never before.

Weaponized penis drives sexual 'arms race'

Evolution works in mysterious ways, especially when it comes to sex.

Samsung investigating Galaxy S8 'iris hack'

Samsung Electronics is investigating claims by a German hacking group that it fooled the iris recognition system of the new flagship Galaxy S8 device, the firm said Wednesday.

Qatar says state news agency hacked

Qatar said Wednesday its official state news agency was hacked and subsequently carried a "false statement" on sensitive regional topics attributed to the country's Emir, Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al-Thani.

Study finds heavier precipitation in the northeast began in 1996

Over the past century, the Northeast has experienced an increase in the number of storms with extreme precipitation. A Dartmouth-led study finds that the increase in extreme Northeast storms occurred as an abrupt shift in 1996, particularly in the spring and fall, rather than as a steady change over ...