PhysOrg (421)

Masterchef technique found to be a lifesaver for endangered sea turtle eggs

Monash University scientists have made the unlikely discovery that a popular Masterchef technique can protect the eggs of endangered sea turtles during transport.

Snapper family ties provide new evidence on marine reserves

A higher proportion of young snapper in fishing areas north of Auckland are related to adult snapper from the Goat Island Marine Reserve, confirming what scientists have long suspected: the reserve acts as a giant snapper nursery.

Researchers outline strategies for college presidents to guide a campus through emergencies

Demonstrators shut down conservative speakers at Berkeley; a student opens fire in a classroom at Virginia Tech; an alleged brutal assault at Virginia makes international headlines before the story collapses. Each incident poses a distinct threat to the university, both in terms of physical and ...

Software improves captioning for those with hearing deficits

Making sure deaf and hard-of-hearing students get the information presented in class and current academic events requires a lot of advance planning by the students and the offices that serve them.

World hunger is increasing thanks to wars and climate change

Around the globe, about 815 million people – 11 percent of the world's population – went hungry in 2016, according to the latest data from the United Nations. This was the first increase in more than 15 years.

Video: How do we verify climate treaties?

As of May 2017, about 90 percent of all countries around the world have committed to the ambitious Paris Agreement to combat global climate change. The shared goal is to rein in greenhouse gas emissions enough to maintain global temperatures just two degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels.

The puzzle to plugging the worst natural gas release in history

By the time Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientists Barry Freifeld and Curt Oldenburg visited the Aliso Canyon natural gas storage facility in December 2015, the SS-25 well blowout had been leaking natural gas into the air for more than six weeks. The notoriously strong winds at Aliso ...

Was agriculture the greatest blunder in human history?

Twelve thousand years ago everybody lived as hunters and gatherers. But by 5,000 years ago most people lived as farmers.

More efficient separation of methane and CO2

To make natural gas and biogas suitable for use, the methane has to be separated from the CO2. This involves the use of membranes, filters that stop the methane and allow the CO2 to pass through. Researchers at KU Leuven , Belgium, have developed a new membrane that makes the separation process much ...

Scientists explain the pseudocapacitance phenomenon in supercapacitors

Scientists in Russia and Armenia have predicted a new surface reconstruction of RuO2 that explains the origin of charge storage in supercapacitors. The miniaturization of electronic devices to the nanometer scale will increase the role of surface and quantum effects in terms of the properties and ...

Wealth redistribution, not tax cuts, key to economic growth

President Trump's new tax plan will follow the familiar script of reducing taxes for the rich in the name of job creation. Not only will these trickle-down policies not work—they'll make the problem worse. A new report by a team of complexity scientists demonstrates an alternative: Increase ...

Researchers report toothy findings in odontode-bearing catfish study

Certain species of catfish are covered with bony plates bristling with thin teeth, similar to extinct vertebrate lineages. These teeth, which regularly fall out and grow back, are used for defense and, in males, to attract females. Researchers at the University of Geneva , Switzerland, wanted to ...

Chemists develop a promising drug synthesis method

Scientists from RUDN University with their colleagues from Yaroslavl have developed a new way to synthesize 1,2,4-oxadiazole derivatives used in many drugs. 1,2,4-oxadiazoles include ataluren, the active ingredient of a drug used in a treatment for genetic disorders. The results of the work are ...

Missing link between new topological phases of matter discovered

Physicists at BESSY II have investigated a class of materials that exhibit characteristics of topological insulators. During these studies, they discovered a transition between two different topological phases, one of which is ferroelectric, meaning a phase in the material that exhibits spontaneous ...

New Amazon threat? Deforestation from mining

Sprawling mining operations in Brazil are destroying much more of the iconic Amazon forest than previously thought, says the first comprehensive study of mining deforestation in the world's largest tropical rainforest.

Gentle touch soothes the pain of social rejection

The gentle touch of another individual soothes the effects of social exclusion, one of the most emotionally painful human experiences, according to new UCL research.

Big question for US cities: Is Amazon's HQ2 worth the price?

Dozens of cities are working frantically to land Amazon's second headquarters, raising a weighty question with no easy answer:

Baidu to hit the road with self-driving bus

Baidu chief executive Robin Li on Tuesday said the Chinese internet giant will have a self-driving bus on the road soon as it races for a lead in autonomous vehicles.

Amazon has brought benefits - and disruption - to Seattle

Memo to the many places vying for Amazon's second headquarters: It ain't all food trucks and free bananas.

Wooing Amazon with sun, fun ... and giant buttons

Mayors from Toledo to Tulsa are so eager to woo Amazon's much-vaunted second headquarters that they're brandishing bourbon, selling the sun, whispering sweet nothings to the company and even pushing its buttons.

New Delhi shuts power plant in fight against Diwali smog

India's environmental watchdog shut down a coal-fired power plant and banned the use of diesel generators in New Delhi as air quality plummeted in the world's most polluted capital on Wednesday, the start of the Diwali festival.

Snap, NBCUniversal form original content venture

NBCUniversal and Snap Inc announced Tuesday a joint venture to produce original scripted shows for Snapchat, the social network popular with young audiences.

Massacre fears spark race to save rare Australia parrot

Critically endangered Swift Parrots are under threat from squirrel-like sugar gliders in a battle for space in Australia's ancient forests, scientists said Wednesday as they race to save the rare birds.

Electric jet startup could become 'Uber in the sky'

Eviation Aircraft chief executive Omer Bar-Yohay pictures a day not too far away when summoning a bargain plane ride with a smartphone will be as easy as hailing Uber.

Privacy groups warn of perils in smartwatches for kids

Smartwatches designed to help parents keep tabs on children could create privacy and security risks, activist and consumer groups said Wednesday as they called for probes by regulators.

Is facial recognition the stuff of sci-fi? Not in China

From toilet-paper dispensers to fast-food restaurants, travel and crime-fighting, China is taking the lead in rolling out facial-recognition technology.

Bidding war heats up for $5 billion second Amazon HQ

It's the prize of a lifetime—a $5 billion investment creating 50,000 well-paid jobs that everyone wants, but only one US city will get.

Intel working with Facebook on chips for AI

Intel chief Brian Krzanich said Tuesday his company is working on a super-fast chip designed specifically for artificial intelligence.

Healthy coral populations produce a surprising number of offspring

Healthy coral populations can produce up to 200 times more juvenile corals than degraded coral populations nearby, according to a new study in Conservation Letters.

Crowdsourced game aims to find solutions to aflatoxin

Mars, Inc., UC Davis and partners have launched a crowdsourcing initiative to solve the problem of aflatoxin contamination of crops. A series of aflatoxin puzzles will go online on Foldit, a platform that allows gamers to explore how amino acids are folded together to create proteins. The puzzles ...

New simple method determines rate at which we burn calories walking up, down, flat

When military strategists plan a mission, one of many factors is the toll it takes on the Army's foot soldiers.

Nice ice, maybe: Study finds water-repelling surfaces ease ice removal

Water-repellent surfaces and coatings could make ice removal a literal breeze by forcing ice to grow up rather than just skate by, says a new study from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and several Chinese institutions.

Live fast die young: Updating signal detection theory

Signal Detection Theory is a popular and well-established idea that has influenced behavioral science for around 50 years. Essentially, the theory holds that in a predator-prey relationship, prey animals will show more wariness and be more prone to flee as predators become more common. Danger ...

How many golden eagles are there?

For conservation efforts to be effective, wildlife managers need to know how many individuals of a species are out there. When species are spread out over large areas and occur at low densities, as is the case with the Golden Eagle, figuring this out can be tricky. However, a new study from The ...

'You still end up with nothing': Reality of living in work poverty revealed

As the number of working families who live in poverty continues to rise in the UK, a new 'On the front line' article reveals the severe challenges that low pay, limited working hours and constrained employment opportunities bring.

Humans—the disturbing neighbours of reef sharks

Shark diversity and abundance is highest in remote reefs, as far as 25 hours away from main cities, reveals an international study conducted in the New Caledonia archipelago.

As bids for Amazon's headquarters come due, tech has a chance to spread the wealth

As Amazon established its dominance in online retail, logistics and cloud computing, the company's headquarters in Seattle grew appropriately massive. Today it represents a $5 billion investment in 33 buildings, 8 million square feet and more than 40,000 employees.

Hiring not part of Alibaba pledge to create US jobs

Alibaba executive vice chairman Joseph Tsai said Tuesday he expects to boost US jobs by expanding the Chinese firm's e-commerce platform—not by hiring American workers.

US nuke waste repository in New Mexico will get more space

Workers are expected to begin mining operations at the U.S. nuclear waste dump in New Mexico for the first time in three years following a radiation release that contaminated part of the underground repository, the Energy Department said Tuesday.

Earth's new traveling buddy is definitely an asteroid, not space junk

At the 49th Annual Division for Planetary Sciences Meeting in Provo, Utah, astronomers led by Vishnu Reddy at the University of Arizona confirm true nature of one of Earth's companions on its journey around the sun.  

In search of the ninth planet

A University of Michigan doctoral student has logged two pieces of evidence that may support the existence of a planet that could be part of our solar system, beyond Neptune.

New examination of occupational licensing contradicts decades of research

From doctors to engineers to carpet layers to massage therapists, more than one in three Americans is required to hold a license to work in their occupation. Broad consensus among researchers holds that licensure creates wage premiums by establishing economic monopolies, but according to ...

Fighting fires before they spark

With warm, dry summers comes a deadly caveat for the western United States: wildfires. Scientists say the hot, dry climates found west of the Mississippi, along with decades of fire suppression efforts, are creating a devastating and destructive combination - leading to fires like the ones currently ...

Study links chocolate production to increased deforestation in poor nations

Every year, more than five million family farms in countries such as Côte d'Ivoire, Cameroon, Indonesia and Brazil produce about four and a half million tons of cocoa beans, according the World Cocoa Foundation. Ghana and the Ivory Coast supply more than 70 percent of the world's cocoa.

Fire crews protect observatory on Southern California peak

A dozen aircraft dropped water and fire retardant as crews worked in steep terrain Tuesday to battle a blaze near an historic observatory and communications towers on Mount Wilson northeast of Los Angeles.

Apple clinics for your health? It almost just happened

How about hitting your local Apple store for a quick health check-up? It's not as crazy as it sounds.

Airbnb rentals boom across Africa

Rent-a-room giant Airbnb said Tuesday that it had provided accommodation for 1.2 million visitors to Africa over the last year—double the previous year as tourism expands across the continent.

New fires break out in California as wine country fires dim

As crews gained on the wildfires in California wine country, new blazes broke out in other parts of the state, including a fire in the mountains above Los Angeles that threatened a historic observatory Tuesday and more flames in the Santa Cruz mountains.

What next for Amazon studio?

As the head of Amazon's entertainment studio since 2014, Roy Price was tasked with shaping the e-retailer into a major player in the film and TV world.

Amazonian hunters deplete wildlife but don't empty forests

Conservationists can be "cautiously optimistic" about the prospect of sustainable subsistence hunting by Amazonian communities - according to new research from the University of East Anglia.