PhysOrg (397)

AI and e-commerce—a perfect storm for retail jobs

If you work in retail sales, it might be time to explore a new career, according to a Missouri S&T researcher.

When artificial intelligence evaluates chess champions

The ELO system, which most chess federations use today, ranks players by the results of their games. Although simple and efficient, it overlooks relevant criteria such as the quality of the moves players actually make. To overcome these limitations, Jean-Marc Alliot of the Institut de recherche en ...

A novel form of iron for fortification of foods

Whey protein nanofibrils loaded with iron nanoparticles: ETH researchers are developing a new and highly effective way of fortifying iron into food and drinks.

Image: James Webb Space Telescope mirror seen in full bloom

It's springtime and the deployed primary mirror of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope looks like a spring flower in full bloom.

Machine learning dramatically streamlines search for more efficient chemical reactions

Even a simple chemical reaction can be surprisingly complicated. That's especially true for reactions involving catalysts, which speed up the chemistry that makes fuel, fertilizer and other industrial goods. In theory, a catalytic reaction may follow thousands of possible paths, and it can take ...

The last remaining male northern white rhino joins Tinder

The most eligible bachelor in the world is on Tinder and he's looking for love…

Research comes through with flying colors

Like a chameleon changing colors to blend into the environment, Lawrence Livermore researchers have created a technique to change the color of assembled nanoparticles with an electrical stimulant.

Physicist improves particle interaction modeling

Quantum electrodynamics is a lot like baking a cake, and then trying to take apart the individual ingredients. At least, that is what physicist Dr. Ulrich Jentschura equates to the process of creating an equation that can couple particles' and antiparticles' predicted masses at the same time.

Clouds' response to pollution clarified with new climate analysis

How the properties of clouds change in response to local pollution - mainly from coal burning and ship engines - has been more accurately determined.

Natural dye garden promotes a greener fashion supply chain

College of Human Ecology faculty and student efforts to develop sustainable approaches to textile and fashion design has led to the development of the Cornell Natural Dye Garden after a successful crowdfunding campaign that ended in fall 2016.

Optimizing cyanobacteria for biofuel production

Cyanobacteria have attracted significant attention as potential biocatalysts for production of clean energy and green chemicals from sunlight and atmospheric CO2. A recent study investigated effects of altering large cellular complexes called phycobilisomes, which cyanobacteria use to efficiently ...

Mystery of the missing mercury at the Great Salt Lake

Around 2010, the deep waters of Utah's Great Salt Lake contained high levels of toxic methylmercury. Mercury measurements in waterfowl surrounding the lake led to a rare human consumption advisory for ducks.

A better way to pasteurize eggs

An Agricultural Research Service scientist in Pennsylvania and his colleagues have developed a technology that rapidly pasteurizes eggs and could sharply reduce the number of illnesses caused each year by egg-borne Salmonella bacteria.

Image: Titan flyby 22 April 2017

In the early hours of Saturday morning, the international Cassini–Huygens mission made its final close flyby of Saturn's largest moon, Titan, coming within 1000 km of the atmosphere-clad world.

European tornadoes are an unrecognised threat, say U.K. meteorologists

Tornadoes are an underestimated threat across Europe with the UK, Germany, and northern Italy at the greatest risk as tornado season fast approaches.

'Quantum simulator' facilitates research into theoretical supermaterials

Physicists at Utrecht University have created a 'quantum simulator,' a model system to study theoretical prognoses for a whole new class of materials. These 'supermaterials' include graphene, which has a two-dimensional structure and unique characteristics. The experiments conducted in Utrecht not ...

Nano-notch sends self-assembling polymers into a spiral

A simple circular or hexagonal pit written into silicon can be used to generate self-assembling polymer spirals thanks to the addition of a tiny notch in the template, report scientists in the launch issue of Nano Futures.

New CERN results show novel phenomena in proton collisions

In a paper published today in Nature Physics , the ALICE collaboration reports that proton collisions sometimes present similar patterns to those observed in the collisions of heavy nuclei. This behaviour was spotted through observation of so-called strange hadrons in certain proton collisions in ...

Research shows global warming making oceans more toxic

Climate change is predicted to cause a series of maladies for world oceans including heating up, acidification, and the loss of oxygen. A newly published study published online in the April 24 edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences titled "Ocean warming since 1982 has ...

Researchers introduce new battery charging technology that uses light to charge batteries

A team of researchers affiliated with UNIST has developed a single-unit, photo-rechargeable portable power source based on high-efficiency silicon solar cells and lithium-ion batteries .

Safe, efficient way to produce hydrogen from aluminum particles and water for in-flight aircraft energy

Aerospace engineers at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology have developed and patented a process that can be used onboard aircraft while in flight to produce hydrogen from water and aluminum particles safely and cheaply. The hydrogen can then be converted into electrical energy for inflight ...

Preliminary results of Breakthrough Listen project released

—The team of researchers working on the Breakthrough Listen project has released preliminary findings after sifting through several petabytes of data obtained from three telescopes involved in the research project. The findings have been made available on the project's website as the team ...

The initial collision between Indian and Asian continental

The vast Tibetan Plateau, with high altitude and intense uplift, is like a holy land for Earth science researchers. It has earned a reputation as "the third pole of the world," relative to the Arctic Pole and Antarctic Pole. A recent study reveals processes of the India-Eurasia continental ...

'Pharmacoscopy' enables immunomodulatory drug discovery by analyzing immune cell interactions

The immune system consists of a great variety of cell types fulfilling diverse tasks in monitoring tissue homeostasis to protect against pathogens and to remove damaged cells. To ensure the smooth, controlled function of this highly complex system, immune cells use a wide range of biochemical ...

Scientists create new system of concrete building structures

Professor Andrey Ponomarev of Peter the Great Saint-Petersburg Polytechnic University and graduate student Alexander Rassokhin have developed several types of building blocks for construction based on nanostructured high-strength lightweight concrete reinforced with skew-angular composite coarse ...

Interdisciplinary studies reveal relationship between solar activity and climate change

Solar flux is considered to be the fundamental energy source of Earth's climate system on long time scales. In recent decades, some studies have noted that tiny variations in solar activity could be amplified by the nonlinear process in the climate system. Therefore, factors such as solar activity ...

First cable-driven robot that prints large-sized components in 3-D

Together with the Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia , Tecnalia has developed the first cable-driven robot that allows large parts and even small buildings to be created in situ. The innovative technology includes the latest advances in the field of robotics, digital manufacturing and ...

Smartphone app lets user 'walk a mile in a refugee's shoes'

The United Nations helped launch a smartphone app Tuesday that allows users to "walk a mile in a refugee's shoes" by simulating the daily struggles of a fictional Rohingya Muslim who was forced to flee her home.

New atlas provides highest-resolution imagery of the Polar Regions seafloor

The most comprehensive and high-resolution atlas of the seafloor of both Polar Regions is presented this week at the European Geosciences Union General Assembly in Vienna. Over 250 marine geologists and glaciologists from around the world have spent the last four years collating stunning seafloor ...

With new method, engineers can control and separate fluids on a surface using only visible light

A new system developed by engineers at MIT could make it possible to control the way water moves over a surface, using only light. This advance may open the door to technologies such as microfluidic diagnostic devices whose channels and valves could be reprogrammed on the fly, or field systems that ...

Humans threaten crucial 'fossil' groundwater: study

Human activity risks contaminating pristine water locked underground for millennia and long thought impervious to pollution, said a study on Tuesday that warned of a looming threat to the crucial resource.

Genetics and environment combine to give everyone a unique sense of smell

Researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators have shown that receptors in the noses of mice exposed to certain smells during life are different to genetically similar mice that lived without those smells. Published today in eLife, the study found it is this ...

Study: Early organic carbon got deep burial in mantle

Rice University petrologists who recreated hot, high-pressure conditions from 60 miles below Earth's surface have found a new clue about a crucial event in the planet's deep past.

Ice plant to help fight global warming effects on bioenergy crops

The unassuming ice plant could become an ingenious weapon in the fight against a warming climate that threatens to limit regions suitable for growing biofuel crops. Biochemist and molecular biologist John Cushman at the University of Nevada, Reno will create a gene atlas for the common ice plant ...

Vermont rescues starving bear cubs after wild food shortage

Vermont biologists say they've rescued several year-old bear cubs found starving this spring after a shortage of wild food in the state last fall.

UNEP chief confident US will not ditch Paris climate deal

The UN's environment chief is confident that the United States will not pull out of the Paris climate deal and expects a decision from Washington next month.

Official: 'Silver lining' in hacker, foreign nation alliance

Foreign governments that rely on the services of private criminal hackers leave their operations vulnerable to being exposed and disrupted, creating something of a "silver lining" for U.S. law enforcement investigations of cyberattacks, a top Justice Department official said Monday.

SK Hynix posts record Q1 profit on mobile chip demand

South Korean chipmaker SK Hynix made record quarterly profits in the first three months of the year, it said Tuesday, with strong demand for memory chips for mobile gadgets pushing up prices.

More Antarctic protections urged on World Penguin Day

The world needs to do more to protect the Antarctic wilderness and its wildlife, scientists warned Tuesday, as they marked World Penguin Day.

Upward mobility has fallen sharply in US: study

In a sign of the fading American Dream, 92 percent of children born in 1940 earned more than their parents, but only half of those born in 1984 can say the same, researchers said Monday.

Sex, lies and physics: 'Genius' drama is Einstein tell-all

The unparalleled brilliance and puckish wit? Check. The trademark wild mop of hair? Check. The marital infidelity and free-wheeling sex?

Team identifies genetic target for growing hardier plants under stress

The function of a plant's roots go well beyond simply serving as an anchor in the ground. The roots act as the plant's mouth, absorbing, storing and channeling water and nutrients essential for survival.

Researchers invent process to make sustainable rubber, plastics

Synthetic rubber and plastics - used for manufacturing tires, toys and myriad other products - are produced from butadiene, a molecule traditionally made from petroleum or natural gas. But those manmade materials could get a lot greener soon, thanks to the ingenuity of a team of scientists from ...

Citizens can productively change politics by taking the law to court

If you think threatening suit is a conversation stopper, think again. Citizen lawsuits can actually promote compromise between lawmakers and influence decisions to pay for public goods like clean water, air, and health care.

Heavy precipitation speeds carbon exchange in tropics

New research by the University of Montana and its partner institutions gives insight into how forests globally will respond to long-term climate change. Cory Cleveland, a UM professor of terrestrial ecosystem ecology, said that previous research in the wet tropics - where much of global forest ...

'Celestial Sleuth' credits Messier with discovery 238 years after the fact

The Ring Nebula is one of the most spectacular deep-sky objects in the heavens. It is easily located by backyard astronomers, intensely studied by astrophysicists and relied upon for show-stopping images on countless book covers and calendar pages.

Cassini completes final—and fateful—Titan flyby

NASA's Cassini spacecraft has had its last close brush with Saturn's hazy moon Titan and is now beginning its final set of 22 orbits around the ringed planet.

Simple technique produces stronger polymers

Plastic, rubber, and many other useful materials are made of polymers—long chains arranged in a cross-linked network. At the molecular level, these polymer networks contain structural flaws that weaken them.

Tests find Samsung's S8 phones more prone to screen cracks

Samsung's latest phones feature big wraparound screens and lots of glass. They also appear to break more easily, according to tests run by SquareTrade, a company that sells gadget-repair plans.

Fossils may be earliest known multicellular life: study

Fossils accidentally discovered in South Africa are probably the oldest fungi ever found by a margin of 1.2 billion years, rewriting the evolutionary story of these organisms which are neither flora nor fauna, researchers said Monday.