PhysOrg (354)

Snapchat users might want to be cautious using app's latest feature

Popular cellphone app Snapchat has introduced a new feature called Snap Map that allows users to share their location with friends. Worry about security surfaced immediately.

Canada: Top court orders Google to block website search results

Canada's top court on Wednesday ordered Google to remove a website from its worldwide search results, in what some experts are calling a landmark international copyright protection case.

Use Google to shop? Here's what you should know after the big EU fine

Google was levied a record $2.7 billion fine by the European Commission for allegedly favoring its Google Shopping results over other comparison shopping services.

Revitalizing Detroit requires development of specific neighborhoods

Despite the relatively large number of employees working in downtown Detroit, the city continues to be afflicted by urban blight, surrounded by a swath of vacant neighborhoods. Changing this pervasive phenomenon has been at the forefront for developers, city officials and groups like Detroit Future ...

Slow-growing ponderosas survive mountain pine beetle outbreaks

Slow-growing ponderosa pines may have a better chance of surviving mountain pine beetle outbreaks in western Montana as climate change increases the frequency of drought and insect pests, according to new research published by a team of University of Montana scientists.

Carnegie Science Center gets $7.5M donation for new wing

The Carnegie Science Center has received its largest gift, a $7.5 million donation from PPG and its corporate foundation for the interactive museum in Pittsburgh.

This year's hot graduation gift: Snapchat geofilters

Ann Beverly had eyed a set of golf clubs as a college graduation gift for her son. In an impulse buy during commencement, though, she just had to tack on something else.

How artificial intelligence is taking on ransomware

Twice in the space of six weeks, the world has suffered major attacks of ransomware—malicious software that locks up photos and other files stored on your computer, then demands money to release them.

Man sentenced for money laundering in massive hacking scheme

A Pakistani man has been sentenced to four years in prison for laundering nearly $20 million as part of an international computer and telephone hacking scheme.

Scientists develop super-strong metal for next tech frontier

The technological future of everything from cars and jet engines to oil rigs, along with the gadgets, appliances and public utilities comprising the internet of things, will depend on microscopic sensors.

Soybean rust study will allow breeders to tailor resistant varieties to local pathogens

Midwestern growers don't worry much about soybean rust, but the fungal disease has been popping up at the end of the growing season nearly every year since 2006. But because the fungus can't survive winter without a host plant, it's not much of a threat to Midwest crops under current conditions.

Study on human skin microbiome finds archaea abundance associated with age

It turns out your skin is crawling with single-celled microorganisms—and they're not just bacteria. A study by the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the Medical University of Graz has found that the skin microbiome also contains archaea, a type of extreme-loving ...

3,000-year-old textiles are earliest evidence of chemical dyeing in the Levant

Tel Aviv University archaeologists have revealed that cloth samples found in the Israeli desert present the earliest evidence of plant-based textile dyeing in the region. They were found at a large-scale copper smelting site and a nearby temple in the copper ore district of Timna in Israel's Arava ...

How are long strands of DNA packed into tiny cells?

Scientists are a step closer to understanding how DNA, the molecules that carry all of our genetic information, is squeezed into every cell in the body. How DNA is "packaged" in cells influences the activity of our genes and our risk for disease. Elucidating this process will help researchers in all ...

Nanostructures taste the rainbow

Engineers at Caltech have for the first time developed a light detector that combines two disparate technologies—nanophotonics, which manipulates light at the nanoscale, and thermoelectrics, which translates temperature differences directly into electron voltage—to distinguish different ...

Nanopipette technology wins first place in NIH 'Follow that Cell' challenge

Nader Pourmand, professor of biomolecular engineering in the Baskin School of Engineering at UC Santa Cruz, has won the $300,000 first place prize in the Follow that Cell Challenge organized by the National Institutes of Health .

Zeolite catalysts pave the road to decentral chemical processes

Fuel from waste? It is possible. But hitherto, converting organic waste to fuel has not been economically viable. Excessively high temperatures and too much energy are required. Using a novel catalyst concept, researchers at the Technical University of Munich have now managed to significantly reduce ...

Palm cockatoos beat drum like Ringo Starr

Professor Rob Heinsohn said while songbirds and whales can belt out a musical tune, few species recognise a beat.

Researchers develop yeast-based tool for worldwide pathogen detection

Columbia University researchers have developed a tool that is likely to revolutionize the way we detect and treat pathogens in everything from human health to agriculture to water. Using only common household baker's yeast, they've created an extremely low-cost, low-maintenance, on-site dipstick ...

'Bulges' in volcanoes could be used to predict eruptions

A team of researchers from the University of Cambridge have developed a new way of measuring the pressure inside volcanoes, and found that it can be a reliable indicator of future eruptions.

High sea surface temperatures may affect immune competence of California sea lions

Anomalously high sea surface temperatures may compromise the immune response of California sea lions, according to a study published June 28, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Karina Acevedo-Whitehouse from Autonomous University of Queretaro, Mexico, and colleagues.

More summer sunshine leading to increased Greenland ice melt

A team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, has discovered that a marked decrease in summer cloud cover during the last 20 years has significantly accelerated melt from the Greenland ice sheet.

Concurrent hot and dry summers more common in future: study

A combination of severe drought and a heatwave caused problems for Russia in the summer of 2010: fires tore through forests and peat bogs. Moscow was shrouded in thick smog, causing many deaths in the local population. At the same time, Pakistan was engulfed in heavy rain, as the high-pressure area ...

Can antipoverty programs work globally? J-PAL offers user's guide

It is a huge question in development economics: If a program yields good results in one country, will it work in another? Does a vaccination policy in India translate to Africa? Does a teen-pregnancy prevention program in Kenya work in Rwanda?

Analysis of Neanderthal teeth grooves uncovers evidence of prehistoric dentistry

Neanderthals treating toothaches?

Scientists identify key locations for spread of Pin-tailed Whydahs

Invasive parasites are a biological oxymoron. And yet, they are in our backyards! A new study analyzes the case of a brood parasitic bird, the Pin-tailed Whydah , and its recent spread into the Americas.

Guinness World Records names graphene aerogel as world's least dense 3-D printed structure

The world's lightest 3-D printed structure is so lightweight that it can be placed on top of a cotton ball or the petals of a flower.

Chinese authorities put the brakes on a surge in live streaming

It's becoming a common refrain. A new social networking technology takes China by storm. Its users outsmart the censors, ushering in an era of relative freedom. And then, almost inevitably, the Communist Party begins to feel threatened and shuts it down.

Hints of extra dimensions in gravitational waves?

Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics in Potsdam found that hidden dimensions – as predicted by string theory – could influence gravitational waves. In a recently published paper they study the consequences of extra dimensions on these ripples in space-time, ...

2020 deadline to avert climate catastrophe: experts

Humanity must put carbon dioxide emissions on a downward slope by 2020 to have a realistic shot at capping global warming at well under two degrees Celsius, the bedrock goal of the Paris climate accord, experts said Wednesday.

Minnesota scientist: EPA pressured her to change testimony

A Minnesota scientist who leads an Environmental Protection Agency scientific advisory board says she was pressured by the agency's chief of staff to change her testimony before Congress to downplay the Trump administration's decision not to reappoint half of the board's members.

How minimizing fluid friction can make oceangoing vessels more fuel-efficient and reduce harmful emissions

Imagine walking from one side of a swimming pool to the other. Each step takes great effort—that's what makes water aerobics such effective physical exercise.

Calculating 'old' and 'new' water runoff

Just ahead of a rainstorm, Cody Ross might run out to an agricultural research site as part of his graduate work. He'll need to get some dye into an injection well. The point? To evaluate the path that water follows from the field during and after the rainstorm.

Improving Chinese air pollution leads to business opportunities

China's trouble with smog and air pollution is well known, but air quality is beginning to improve as Chinese authorities start to tackle the problem. According to a story in Chemical & Engineering News , the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, their efforts have made China a major ...

Potentially lethal parasite rat lungworm found throughout Florida

University of Florida researchers have found rat lungworm, a parasitic nematode that can cause meningitis in humans and animals, in five Florida counties.

World first: New polymer goes for a walk when illuminated

Scientists at Eindhoven University of Technology and Kent State University have developed a new material that can undulate and therefore propel itself forward under the influence of light. To this end, they clamp a strip of this polymer material in a rectangular frame. When illuminated it goes for a ...

Climate change impacts Antarctic biodiversity habitat

Ice-free areas of Antarctica - home to more than 99 per cent of the continent's terrestrial plants and animals - could expand by more than 17,000km2 by the end of this century, a study published today in Nature reveals.

The multi-colored photons that might change quantum information science

With leading corporations now investing in highly expensive and complex infrastructures to unleash the power of quantum technologies, INRS researchers have achieved a breakthrough in a light-weight photonic system created using on-chip devices and off-the-shelf telecommunications components. In ...

Russia scraps plans to ban Telegram messaging app

Russia has ditched plans to ban the Telegram messaging app after its owner agreed to register the company in the country, authorities said Wednesday.

Swimming microbots can remove pathogenic bacteria from water

The lack of clean water in many areas around the world is a persistent, major public health problem. One day, tiny robots could help address this issue by zooming around contaminated water and cleaning up disease-causing bacteria. Scientists report a new development toward this goal in the journal ...

Real-time vapor analysis could improve training of explosive-detecting dogs

With a sense of smell much greater than humans, dogs are considered the gold standard for explosive detection in many situations. But that doesn't mean there isn't room for improvement. In a study appearing in the ACS' journal Analytical Chemistry, scientists report on a new, more rigorous approach ...

Researchers develop a model that marries ecology and economics to determine how to protect biodiversity

Money may not grow on trees, but trees themselves and all that they provide have a dollar value nonetheless.

Highway safety: National Academies committee recommends implementation improvements

An estimated 550,000 commercial motor carriers —trucks and buses, employing over 4 million drivers—move freight and passengers across U.S. highways each year, resulting in about 100,000 fatality- or injury-causing crashes.

Micron-sized hydrogel cubes show highly efficient delivery of a potent anti-cancer drug

Many potent anti-cancer drugs have major drawbacks—they fail to mix with water, which means they will have a limited solubility in blood, and they lack selectivity to cancer cells.

Does symmetry matter for speed? Study finds Usain Bolt may have asymmetrical running gait

A new method for assessing patterns of ground-force application suggests the right and left legs of the world's fastest man may perform differently, defying current scientific assumptions about running speed.

US to seek more security on international flights

The Homeland Security Department is set to announce new security measures Wednesday for international flights bound to the United States, which could lead to a lifting of a ban on laptops and other electronics from passenger cabins from certain airports.

Vortex-antivortex pairs found in magnetic trilayers

A international team of researchers has discovered magnetic vortex-antivortex pairs arising from correlated electron spins in a newly engineered trilayer material. The discovery could advance memory cells and points to the potential development of 3-D magnetic logic circuits.

Boaty McBoatface returns home with unprecedented data

Researchers at the University of Southampton have captured unprecedented data about some of the coldest abyssal ocean waters on earth - known as Antarctic Bottom Water - during first voyage of the yellow robotic submersible known as Boaty McBoatface, which arrived back in the UK last week.

Bacteria change a liquid's properties and escape entrapment

A flexible tail allows swimming bacteria to thin the surrounding liquid and to free themselves when trapped along walls or obstacles. This finding could influence how bacterial growth on medical, industrial, and agricultural surfaces is controlled. The new study by researchers at Penn State, ...

Sensitive faces helped dinosaurs eat, woo and take temperature, suggests study

Dinosaurs' faces might have been much more sensitive than previously thought, according to a University of Southampton study – helping them with everything from picking flesh from bones to wooing potential mates.