NPR : Science (23)

In Alaska, One Man Fights To Save Oil Fund As Reserves Dry Up

For 40 years, Alaska has been putting its oil money into a giant savings account. But now the oil — and the money — are drying up.

California's Forests Continue To Die After Years Of Drought

California's record drought is officially over. But trees are still dying across the state because they were so badly weakened by years without water.

How To Tell If Watching The Eclipse Damaged Your Eyes

If you heeded all the warnings, you're likely fine. But spots or blurred vision that shows up 12 hours later or the next day might be a sign that the sun's direct rays permanently hurt the retina.

'Blinded By The Light': Your Contributions To Our Solar Eclipse Soundtrack

While watching the total eclipse, folks might want to follow along with some toe-tapping music about the sun, stars and moon. We've got the playlist for the wondrous sky event.

As India's Climate Changes, Farmers In The North Experiment With New Crops

Farmers are starting to grow new crops in winter, when their fields usually lie fallow. Meanwhile, air pollution, which contributes to climate change, is weakening India's solar energy production.

Be Smart: A Partial Eclipse Can Fry Your Naked Eyes

And telescopes and binoculars only amplify the risk to your eyes from looking at the sun, doctors say. So even if you're not in the "path of totality," take precautions if you plan to watch.

California Prepares For An Eclipse Of Its Solar Power

On a sunny day, California gets up to 40 percent of its energy from solar power. Monday's total eclipse isn't just a scientific spectacle, it's a major concern for the state's power grid.

Exclusive: Inside The Lab Where Scientists Are Editing DNA In Human Embryos

NPR gets exclusive access to a lab in Portland, Ore., where scientists have begun editing the DNA in human embryos to try to prevent genetic diseases.

California Prepares For An Eclipse Of Its Solar Power

On a sunny day, California gets up to 40 percent of its energy from solar power, so Monday's total eclipse isn't just a scientific spectacle, it's a major concern for the state's power grid.

Will The Eclipse Make Crops And Animals Flip Out? Scientists Ask

During the day on Aug. 21, large swaths of farmland will be plunged into darkness, and temperatures will drop about 10 degrees. And scientists are waiting to see what happens on the ground.

Bears Can Face Summer Challenges In Roadside Zoos

Even when the Animal Welfare Act is followed, bears may not live in conditions that many would find reasonable for such large, intelligent animals to flourish, says anthropologist Barbara J. King.

Chemists Say You Should Add A Little Water To Your Whiskey. Here's Why

It's a common refrain from whiskey enthusiasts: Adding a few drops of water to a glass opens up the flavors of the drink. Chemists in Sweden provide a molecular explanation for why this works.

Rituals To Sprinkle A Little Magic Into Your Eclipse Experience

A slightly witch-y mother, an astrologer, and the co-writer of a guide for Basic Witches share their eclipse rituals.

Probiotic Bacteria Could Protect Newborns From Deadly Infection

Each year more than 600,000 babies die of sepsis. Researchers have found a simple way to prevent it: Feed babies probiotic bacteria that are common in kimchi, pickles and other fermented vegetables.

With Heavy Drinking On The Rise, How Much Is Too Much?

Binge-drinking sounds like an all-night bender, but here's a reality check: Many social drinkers may "binge" without knowing it. Women who drink four or more drinks on an occasion are binge-drinking.

NASA Astronauts Set To Get Sweet Treat With Next Delivery To International Space Station

This week, a rocket bound for the International Space Station lifted off with 6,400 pounds of supplies. Along with the provisions, medical supplies and experiments, NASA astronauts will be getting a special care package with ice cream.

Can We Feed The World With Farmed Fish?

New research suggests there is space on the open ocean to farm essentially all the seafood humans can eat — and then some. But such volumes of fish and shellfish could not be grown without costs.

Science, Solitude And The Sacred On The Appalachian Trail

There is no greater source for science, for the inspiration to do science, than the wild; that is where the sense of sacredness at the root of science's aspiration lives, says blogger Adam Frank.

Greenland Is Still Burning, But The Smoke May Be The Real Problem

Wildfires are still burning in western Greenland, close to the Arctic island's ice sheet. As the fires burn, they release black particles that can coat the ice and snow, and make it melt more quickly.

6,000-Year-Old Knee Joints Suggest Osteoarthritis Isn't Just Wear And Tear

Even after a Harvard team took into account differences in age and weight among ancient specimens and knees today, they found that modern humans tend to have more osteoarthritis.

New Study Highlights Strong Link Between Basic Research And Inventions

A big waste of money or the engine of marketplace innovation? That's how some people see basic scientific research. Now a new study shows how basic research and inventions are connected.

In Children's Storybooks, Realism Has Advantages

Young children have an easier time exporting what they learn from a fictional storybook to the real world when the storybook is realistic, says psychologist Tania Lombrozo.

Why Future Earthlings Won't See Total Solar Eclipses

The Earth won't enjoy total solar eclipses forever because the moon is moving farther away, so it looks smaller and smaller over time.