NPR : Science (15)

Orionid Meteor Shower Will Peak Overnight, With Best Show Before Dawn

Last year, the Orionids were hampered by a bright moon. But this year, there's barely a sliver of moon in the sky, which should allow the remnants of Halley's Comet to shine.

To Reduce Risk Of Recurring Bladder Infection, Try Drinking More Water

While it may seem simple, drinking water flushes bacteria out of the urethra, helping to prevent infection in women prone to them. And it also may help reduce the use of antibiotics.

Body Cam Study Shows No Effect On Police Use Of Force Or Citizen Complaints

That's the conclusion of a study performed as Washington, D.C., rolled out its huge program. The city has one of the largest forces in the country, with some 2,600 officers now wearing cameras.

Do You Care If Your Fish Dinner Was Raised Humanely? Animal Advocates Say You Should

Concerns over animal welfare have led to changes in recent years in how livestock are raised. But seafood has been missing from the conversation. One group aims to change that.

CIA Trainee Washes Out Of Bomb Detection, Reassigned To Living Room

The agency says that Lulu, a black Labrador being trained to sniff out explosives, just wasn't that into it.

Should College Professors Give 'Tech Breaks' In Class?

Is it necessary coddling or just good science to give college students breaks to check their phones? Anthropologist Barbara J. King takes a look.

For Novelist John Green, OCD Is Like An 'Invasive Weed' Inside His Mind

"It starts out with one little thought, and then slowly that becomes the only thought that you're able to have," Green says. His new novel, Turtles All The Way Down, is about a teenage girl with OCD.

A New Era For Astronomy Has Begun

Astronomy is forever changed by the viewing of the collision of neutron stars; we can now watch these processes in many different ways as they run their course, says astrophysicist Marcelo Gleiser.

Where Do We Come From?

Look in a microscope to find out.

Scientists Push To House More Lab Monkeys In Pairs

Enhancing a research monkey's life by housing it with a pal often doesn't hurt the study, says a researcher who's done it. In her own experience, she says, "it actually helped to improve the science."

Search Of DNA In Dogs, Mice And People Finds 4 Genes Linked To OCD

Scientists looking for genetic factors behind obsessive compulsive disorder looked for clues in the DNA of humans and two animal species. Genes active in a particular brain circuit emerged.

Astronaut Scott Kelly's Latest Mission: A Book

After a year in space, Kelly says, writing a book was harder than he thought — but still, he adds, "If I write a bad sentence people are only going to get angry with me. They're not going to die."

Nostalgia Isn't Just A Fixation On The Past - It Can Be About The Future, Too

Is nostalgia an emotion that's bitter, or sweet? Psychologist Clay Routledge explains what causes us to feel nostalgic and how nostalgia affects us.

Studies Skewed By Focus On Well-Off, Educated Brains

What does a "normal" brain look like? Something a lot different when researchers make sure that study participants reflect the race, education and income levels of the U.S. at large.

'Quackery' Chronicles How Our Love Of Miracle Cures Leads Us Astray

Tobacco enemas? Mercury pills? Ice pick lobotomies? A new book explains how throughout history, miracle "cures" often didn't just fail to improve people's health, they maimed and killed.