NPR : International (133)

Turkey Says Trump Promises To Stop Arming Kurds In Syria

The U.S. policy of supporting the Kurds in Syria has been a sticking point in U.S.-Turkey relations. The White House cited "pending adjustments" to military support provided to U.S. partners in Syria.

German Government Trying To Bring Back Children Who Ended Up With ISIS

The German Foreign Ministry is trying to negotiate the return of German children who ended up with ISIS through no fault of their own. Some of the children were taken to Iraq and Syria by their German parents, while others were born there.

Iraqi Authorities Trying To Deal With A Complicated Legacy Of ISIS Fighters

Many foreign ISIS families are in the process of being moved to Baghdad as Iraq works to persuade countries like Russia and Turkey, to take back foreign wives and children of ISIS fighters.

Pope Francis To Visit Myanmar And Bangladesh Amid Rohingya Crisis

Pope Francis is wading into the controversial Rohingya crisis with his upcoming trip to Myanmar and Bangladesh. Among those he will visit is Nobel Peace Prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi, who has been heavily criticized for not denouncing Myanmar's military crackdown on the Muslim minority.

Deadly Attack In Egypt Leaves At Least 235 Dead

At least 235 people were killed in Egypt today as the country experienced its deadliest terror attack ever. A Sufi mosque in the Sinai Peninsula was bombed during Friday prayers — and attackers sprayed worshippers with gunfire. NPR's Elise Hu speaks with AFP's Samer Al-Atrush about the aftermath.

Emmerson Mnangagwa Sworn In As Zimbabwe's New Leader

After 37 years of governance under President Robert Mugabe, Zimbabwe has a new leader. Emmerson Mnangagwa was sworn in today amid celebration and hopes that he can repair the country's depressed economy.

Zimbabwe Swears In A New President, In The First Transfer Of Power Since Independence

Emmerson Mnangagwa, whose firing by now-ousted President Robert Mugabe prompted military intervention, promises to change the government's culture after years of corruption and economic trouble.

Mosque Attack In Egypt's Sinai Kills At Least 235

At least 235 people died in the bombing and shooting attack by assailants against a mosque in the Sinai Peninsula during Friday prayers.

Oscar Pistorius' Prison Sentence More Than Doubled

South Africa's Supreme Court said it was sentencing the former Olympian to 15 years, minus time served, for the 2013 murder of his girlfriend. Prosecutors said his original sentence was too lenient.

Mosque Attack In Egypt's Sinai Kills More Than 100

Egypt's state news agency MENA reports at least 184 people died in the bombing and shooting attack by assailants against a mosque in the Sinai Peninsula.

Dozens Killed In Attack On Egyptian Mosque

Dozens of people have been killed after an attack on a mosque in Egypt's north Sinai.

Zimbabwe Swears In A New President

Emmerson Mnangagwa has been sworn in as the president of Zimbabwe, days after the country's longtime leader Robert Mugabe resigned.

Navy Calls Off Search For Missing Sailors

The U.S. Navy has ended its search for three missing sailors whose cargo plane crashed into the Pacific Ocean.

Oscar Pistorius' Sentence More Than Doubled

South Africa's Supreme Court said it was sentencing Pistorius to 15 years, minus time served, for the 2013 murder of his girlfriend. Prosecutors said his original sentence was too lenient.

Uproar Over Elephant Trophies Overshadows Changes To Lion Imports

The Trump administration lifted a ban on importing elephant and lion trophies from two African countries. National Geographic's Rachael Bale explains how this could affect conservation efforts.

Relations Sour Between The U.S. And Turkey

Relations between the U.S. and its important ally Turkey are getting increasingly worse as a Turkish businessman goes on trial in New York and the Turkish president gets closer to Russia.

Climate Change Challenges Chile's Vineyards

Climate change is having a big impact on Chile's wine industry. Growers are being forced to change the way they position their grapes, face historic wildfires and battle a plague of hungry rabbits.

News Brief: Navy Aircraft Crash, Flynn May Be Cooperating With Russia Investigation

NBC's Geoff Bennett talks about the latest on the Russia investigation, including signs Michael Flynn may be cooperating. Also, the latest on the Navy aircraft crash in the Philippine Sea.

Navy Ends Search For 3 Missing Sailors In Philippine Sea

"Our thoughts and prayers are with our lost shipmates and their families," said Rear Adm. Marc Dalton, Commander, Task Force 70, according to a U.S. Navy statement.

A New Ominous Clue In Search For Argentine Submarine

An apparent explosion occurred near where the submarine went missing, with 44 crew members aboard.

J.K. Rowling's 'Harry Potter' Translated To Scots, Marking 80th Language

Harry Potter and the Socerer's Stone has been translated to 79 languages. Today, it was published in its 80th translation — Scots.

J.K. Rowling's 'Harry Potter' Translated To Scots, Marking 80th Language

Harry Potter and the Socerer's Stone has been translated to 79 languages. Today, it will be translated into its 80th — Scots.

Zimbabwean Journalist Shares What She Hopes For The Country's Future

After 37 years in power, Zimbabwe's President, Robert Mugabe has stepped down. He's been in power for most of journalist Wadzanai Mhute's life. She shares her memories of a pre-Mugabe Zimbabwe, reflections on the years of his rule, and her hopes for her country's future with NPR's Ari Shapiro.

Rohingya Refugees Say They Are Too Scared To Return To Myanmar

Myanmar and Bangladesh say they have signed an agreement to allow the return of Rohingya refugees who fled to Bangladesh. But many Rohingya say they are too scared of violent attacks in Myanmar to return home.

Putin Is Working To Build Alliances With Leaders The U.S. Often Distances Itself From

Russia's president has had a flurry of meetings with leaders from the Middle East and beyond. Critics say he's trying to exploit what the Kremlin sees as inattention from the Trump administration.

Why Child Marriage Persists In Mexico

In Mexico, 1 in 5 girls marry before they're 18 — some as young as 11. Unlike the rest of the world, child marriage rates have barely fallen in the last 30 years.

Who Is Zimbabwe's New Leader, Emmerson Mnangagwa?

After Robert Mugabe resigned, Emmerson Mnangagwa returned to his country Thursday and asked "all genuine patriotic Zimbabweans to come together."

Myanmar And Bangladesh Announce Tentative Deal On Rohingya Crisis

Myanmar and Bangladesh say they've agreed on terms for the return of hundreds of thousands of refugees to Myanmar. Rohingya Muslims have been fleeing violence the U.S. describes as "ethnic cleansing."

Myanmar, Bangladesh Announce Tentative Deal To Repatriate Rohingya Refugees

Myanmar says it is ready to accept refugees back into the country, but many details of the deal are unclear.

Zimbabwe Gets A New Leader For The First Time

Zimbabwe gets a new president Friday, just the second in its 37-year history. It's still unclear exactly what fate awaits the country's outgoing leader, Robert Mugabe.

Female Safari Guide: 'I Am A Lady But I Am Telling You, I Am Capable'

If Lucy Nabiki Takona passes the silver guiding exam this month, she will be only the second Maasai woman to reach this level.

China Grows Bolder On The World Stage

China has supported one-party control in Cambodia, anti-Rohingya policies in Myanmar, and jettisoning historical baggage in Zimbabwe. These episodes suggest a more assertive Chinese foreign policy.

Yemen On 'The Brink Of Famine' After Saudi Blockade

For an update on the humanitarian crisis in Yemen, NPR's Noel King speaks with the International Rescue Committee's Paolo Cernuschi. He's on the ground in Sanaa.

Saad Hariri Returns To Lebanon As Saudi Arabia And Iran Vie For Influence

Lebanon's prime minister returned and says he's not quitting as he had said earlier. The strange events raised alarms about the rivalry between Saudi Arabia and Iran and their influence in Lebanon.

After Default, Venezuela's Fiscal Woes Spiral While Prosecutors Focus On Corruption

After months of popular unrest, President Nicolas Maduro appears to have cemented his grip on power. But the towering economic troubles that helped inspire that unrest are only getting worse.

Video Shows North Korean Soldier's Dramatic Sprint Across Border

Newly-released CCTV footage shows a jeep speeding through the countryside near the DMZ. Inside is a North Korean soldier making a desperate escape.

Video Shows North Korean Soldier's Dramatic Sprint Across Border

Newly-released CCTV footage released shows a jeep speeding through the countryside near the DMZ. Inside is a North Korean soldier making a desperate escape.

Remembering The 'Monstrous' Legacy Of Ratko Mladic

Mladic's conviction "serves as a reminder of the evil one man can do with an army at his command," writes NPR's Tom Gjelten, who covered the war in Bosnia in the 1990s.

Secretary Of State Tillerson Considering Action In Response To Rohingya Attacks

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson says he believes the attacks on Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar amounts to ethnic cleansing. He's considering targeted sanctions in response.

Local Opposition To The American Presence In Okinawa Is Growing

On Sunday, a U.S. Marine stationed in Okinawa, Japan, drunkenly crashed his truck into another vehicle, killing the driver. NPR's Elise Hu talks with Anna Fifield, Tokyo Bureau Chief for The Washington Post about what the incident means for the American military presence in Okinawa.

Bosnian Journalist Says Conviction Of Ratko Mladic Doesn't Mean Closure

NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with Bosnian journalist Nidzara Ahmetasevic about the conviction of Ratko Mladic for war crimes and committing genocide during a conflict in the former Yugoslavia in the 1990s.

Zimbabwe Has A New Leader After President Robert Mugabe Resigned

Zimbabwe's new leader Emmerson Mnangagwa arrived back in the country and addressed the people about how he'll replace longtime ruler Robert Mugabe. Mnangagwa returned from a self-imposed exile after Mugabe fired him from his vice president role.

Former Military Commander Of Bosnian Serbs Sentenced To Life Imprisonment

The former military commander of the Bosnian Serbs has been sentenced to life imprisonment by an international court. This comes after he was found guilty of committing genocide and war crimes during a conflict in the former Yugoslavia in the 1990s.

Zimbabwe's President-To-Be Returns Home After Brief Exile

Emmerson Mnangagwa, the former vice president of Zimbabwe, fled the country earlier this month. He's returned to take over from longtime president Robert Mugabe, who resigned under pressure.

Earth Is Lit, And That's A Problem

Over the last five years, global light pollution has increased nearly 10 percent, a new study shows, The fastest rise occurred in developing nations.

If The Developing World Can Go Solar, Maybe Puerto Rico Can Too

With most of the island still without electricity, some Puerto Ricans are hoping to follow the example of developing world countries — and turn to the sun for power.

'Butcher Of Bosnia' Ratko Mladic Guilty Of Genocide, Crimes Against Humanity

The International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia found the former Bosnian Serb general guilty of multiple counts of crimes against humanity and one count of genocide.

Tribunal Finds Ratko Mladic Guilty Of Genocide, Crimes Against Humanity In Bosnia

The International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia found the former Bosnian Serb general guilty of multiple counts of crimes against humanity and one count of genocide.

Ratko Mladic Found Guilty Of Genocide, Crimes Against Humanity

After 20 years of trying to bring justice to the former Yugoslavia, we look at the International Criminal Tribunal's end with the sentence for Ratko Mladic.

Ratko Mladic Faces U.N. Tribunal

After 20 years of trying to bring justice to the former Yugoslavia, we look at the International Criminal Tribunal's end with the sentence for Ratko Mladic.