NPR : International (103)

French Wildfires Force 12,000 People To Flee Coastal Resort Areas

Some 12,000 people — including 3,000 campers — reportedly moved to safety in Bormes-les-Mimosas, east of Marseille.

3, 2, 1 ... Bake Off! The Mission To Make Bread In Space

On Earth, crumbs are harmless, but in orbit they can be perilous. But bread is a big deal in Germany, so scientists and engineers there are teaming up to create an oven and dough fit for microgravity.

U.K. To Ban Diesel And Gas Cars In 2040

In an effort to improve air quality, the U.K. government is set to ban the sale of all diesel and gas cars and vans starting in 2040.

Morning News Brief: Senate Debates Health Care, Manafort Subpoena Dropped

Noam Levey of the LA Times has the latest on health care. Also, a Senate committee is dropping their subpoena for Paul Manafort to testify. And the U.K. is set to ban new diesel and gas cars in 2040.

Trump Says Keeping Syrian Refugees In Region Is 'Best Way To Help Most People'

President Trump stood beside Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri in the Rose Garden on Tuesday and said the United States is helping by supporting refugees' needs close to home.

Removal Of Metal Detectors At Holy Site Do Little To Quell Palestinian Protests

Israel removed metal detectors from a Jerusalem holy site to ease tensions with Palestinians. But plans for a new security system have prompted more protests.

New Report Shows 64 Of 195 Countries Aren't Meeting A Basic Vaccination Target

The goal is to reach 90 percent of children with the DTP vaccination — a child's first scheduled immunization. Some countries are barely at 50 percent.

Turkish State New Agency Reveals Locations Of U.S. Troops In Syria

NPR's Kelly McEvers speaks with Roy Gutman, a freelance reporter based in Istanbul, about his article in the Daily Beast about Turkey's leak of secret locations of U.S. troops in Syria.

In Germany, A Comedy Renaissance

Germany and comedy have not been synonymous, to say the least, since World War II. But, now, German comedy is making a comeback.

House Passes New Sanctions On Russia For Interfering In 2016 Election

An overwhelming vote in the House to impose tough new sanctions on Russia for interfering with the 2016 presidential election leaves Trump in a challenging situation — accepting sanctions on Russia or vetoing a bill that has broad bipartisan support.

New Report Shows 64 Of 195 Countries Aren't Meeting Basic Vaccination Target

The goal is to reach 90 percent of children with the DTP vaccination — a child's first scheduled immunization. Some countries are barely at 50 percent.

The Multiplex And The Plane: China's Moves In Surrounding Seas Raise Eyebrows

In the past week, China has pressed its territorial claims in the South and East China seas, opening a cinema on a disputed island and intercepting a U.S. surveillance plane in an "unsafe" encounter.

For South Korea's LGBT Community, An Uphill Battle For Rights

This month's pride celebration in Seoul drew more people than ever. But protesters also showed up in force. Christian activists insist the socially conservative country won't accept sexual minorities.

Iran's Enormous Book Garden In Tehran Houses More Than Just Books

Steve Inskeep talks to Bloomberg reporter Golnar Motevalli, who explains why Iran — a country better known for its censorship — has built what it claims is the world's largest bookstore in Tehran.

Iraqi Civil Defense Workers Recover The Dead From Mosul Battles

They do their work without having been paid for years. Many had to live under ISIS. The number of civilians killed by ISIS or by mortar and air strikes from U.S. and Iraqi forces still isn't known.

House Expected To Pass Russia Sanctions Bill

The House is slated to vote Tuesday on bipartisan legislation to limit the Trump administration's ability to lift sanctions on Russia. Rachel Martin talks to Representative Will Hurd of Texas.

Fox News And 'New York Times' Clash Over Paper's ISIS Reporting

The New York Times and Fox News are engaged in a spat over the cable network's accusations that the paper's reporting in 2015 tipped off an ISIS leader that the U.S. was close to tracking him down.

Trial Opens For Opposition Journalists In Turkey

In Turkey, which is in a state of emergency, the purge continues. Seventeen journalists are on trial amid the government's broader crackdown on the media.

North Korea Mysteriously Shuts Down Its Beer Festival

A China-based tour agency says North Korea informed them of the cancelation. "We don't expect information to be forthcoming," the agency writes.

Polish President Vetoes Two Proposed Laws To Change Judicial System

Polish President Andrzej Duda on Monday vetoes two proposed laws that sought to limit courts' independence. Kelly McEvers talks with Justyna Pawlak of Reuters about what this means for the country.

Scandal Threatens To End Career Of Daughter Of Pakistan Prime Minister

In Pakistan, a corruption scandal could bring down a rising political star, Maryam Sharif, the prime minister's daughter.

Border Dispute Divides Remote Colombian States

Two Colombian states fight over impoverished town that's divided down the middle — and the town has suffered as a result.

Parents Of Terminally Ill British Infant Drop Legal Battle

The parents of Charlie Gard say they have given up their legal battle to allow their critically ill infant to receive experimental treatment for the severe genetic disorder he suffers from.

U.N. Envoy Warns: Ire At Jerusalem Holy Site Must Be Resolved By Week's End

The U.N. Security Council met Monday to seek a solution to the tensions mounting around a mosque complex in the Old City, where Israel recently installed metal detectors, angering Muslim worshippers.

French Philosopher Who Promoted Risk-Taking Dies Attempting Water Rescue

"Being alive is a risk," Anne Dufourmantelle said. She died Friday at the beach in Saint-Tropez while trying to save a drowning child.

Inside The Global Seed Vault, Where The History And Future Of Agriculture Is Stored

Seeds on Ice author Cary Fowler describes the underground tunnel near the North Pole, which stores and protects a collection of 933,000 samples of different, unique crop varieties.

Parents Of Terminally Ill British Baby Charlie Gard End Legal Fight

The couple's lawyer told the London High Court that new medical tests have shown that an experimental treatment would not help at this point, ending their legal fight to transport him to the U.S.

Suicide Bomber Kills At Least 24 In Afghanistan's Capital

The Taliban has claimed responsibility for the latest attack in a wave of recent violence in Kabul.

Poland's President Says He Will Veto Controversial Legislation, Defying His Party

Critics say the two controversial measures would have undermined the independence of the judiciary. Poland has seen days of demonstrations across the country against the legislation.

Blackwater Founder Backs Outsourcing Afghan War-Fighting to Contractors

Steve Inskeep talks to Erik Prince, founder of the now defunct private security firm Blackwater, who has reportedly submitted a proposal to the White House calling for contracting out the Afghan war.

Despite Climate Change Setbacks, Al Gore 'Comes Down On The Side Of Hope'

Even though President Trump promised to pull the U.S. from the Paris climate accord, Al Gore still sees an "excellent chance" of meeting the accord's commitments to reduce global warming.

U.N. Food Program Is The First Line Against Terrorism, Beasley Says

David Greene talks to David Beasley, head of the U.N. World Food Programme, about the famines in Yemen and Nigeria, and how his agency is dealing with threatened funding cuts.

Morning News Brief: Russia Probes, Louisville Clinic Protests

House and Senate investigations into any links between Russia and the Trump campaign continue. Protests erupt outside Kentucky's last clinic that performs abortions.

Blackwater Founder Backs Outsourcing Afghan War To A Private Army

Steve Inskeep talks to Erik Prince, founder of the now defunct private security firm Blackwater, who has reportedly submitted a proposal to the White House calling for contracting out the Afghan war.

Father Of Girl Ticketed For Selling Lemonade Responds To Supporters: 'Make A Stand'

A 5-year-old girl whose sidewalk lemonade stand brought a $195 fine in London has been invited to set up shop elsewhere. Her dad says, "Now she feels less sour about the experience."

Father Of Girl Ticketed For Selling Lemonade Responds To Supporters: 'Make A Stand'

A five-year-old girl whose sidewalk lemonade stand brought a $195 fine in London has been invited to set up shop elsewhere. Her dad says, "Now she feels less sour about the experience."

Chris Froome Wins His Fourth Tour De France Title In Paris

It's the third straight Tour de France victory for Froome, in a race that saw him lose the yellow jersey midway through the tour's 21 stages.

House And Senate Reach Deal On Sanctions For Russia, Iran And North Korea

The sanctions would punish three countries; the bill also aims to prevent President Trump from relaxing sanctions without lawmakers' consent. A House vote is expected on Tuesday.

Fate Of Poland's Supreme Court Is Now In President's Hands, Despite Protests

The U.S. State Department issued a statement urging all sides "to ensure that any judicial reform does not violate Poland's constitution."

U.S. Airstrike Kills Afghan Police Members; More Than A Dozen Killed

The strike hit Afghans who were in a compound that local media describe as a security outpost in a village that had come under attack.

U.S. Intercepts Reportedly Contradict Attorney General On Russia Contacts

The Washington Post reports that spy agencies intercepted communications involving Russia's U.S. ambassador that suggest he and Sessions discussed campaign matters during mid-2016 meetings.

Millions At Risk Of Starvation And Most Americans Don't Know

NPR's Scott Simon talks with David Miliband, CEO of the International Rescue Committee about near-famine conditions in Africa and the Middle East, and what Americans know about the crises.

Sharing Resources Across Countries To Fight Wildfires

Fires are burning in British Columbia. Scott Simon talks to Alan Goodwin of the Australasian Fire and Emergency Service Authorities Council, a program that shares firefighters with other countries.

U.S. Intercepts Reportedly Contradict Attorney General On Russia Contacts

The Washington Post reports that spy agencies intercepted conversations with Russia's U.S. ambassador suggesting he and Jeff Sessions discussed campaign matters during mid-2016 meetings.

Al-Qaida Suspect Appears In Federal Court In Pennsylvania

Ali Charaf Damache is the first terrorism-related suspect to be sent to the U.S. since President Trump took office.

3 Palestinians Killed In Violent Clashes With Israelis Near Jerusalem Religious Site

In a day of intensifying violence, three Palestinians were killed during a wave of clashes with Israeli forces. Later a Palestinian stabbed to death three Israelis in a West Bank Jewish settlement.

After Otto Warmbier's Death, U.S. Plans To Ban Travel To North Korea

The move comes after the death of American Otto Warmbier, who spent a year and a half in a North Korean jail only to return home in a coma.

Rwanda Works To Ban Sale Of Second Hand Clothes Within 2 Years

Rwanda is pushing through a plan to ban second hand clothes within two years. The government says it's about "dignity," but the plan threatens trade with the U.S. and a central part of poor people's lives.

3 Palestinians Killed In Violent Clashes With Israelis Near Jerusalem Religious Site

Three Palestinians were killed in clashes with Israelis near the Jerusalem hilltop revered and disputed among Jews and Muslims — the Noble Sanctuary or Temple Mount.

After Otto Warmbier's Death, U.S. Plans To Ban Travel To North Korea

The U.S. is about to ban travel by U.S. citizens to North Korea. The move comes after the death of American Otto Warmbier, who spent a year and a half in a North Korean jail only to return home in a coma.