NPR : Culture (56)

In A Future Ruled By Big Pharma, A Robot Tentatively Explores Freedom — And Sex: 'Autonomous'

Annalee Newitz's tale of a pharmaceutical pirate and the dangerous agents hunting her is built on tender, intimate characterizations that probe notions of selfhood, gender and ownership.

Film Chronicles The Road To The 2-Hour Marathon: It's 'Just 25 Seconds Away'

The documentary Breaking2 follows three elite runners as they attempt to break one of the most famous barriers in sport — maintaining 26.2 four-minute, 34-second miles.

'The Autobiography Of Gucci Mane': A Story Of Rap And Rebirth

NPR's Ailsa Chang talks to rapper about his new book, The Autobiography of Gucci Mane. It traces his life as an artist who forged an unlikely path to stardom and personal rebirth.

Exhibit Highlights The Work Of The Late Avant-Garde Artist Florine Stettheimer

Stettheimer, who died in 1944, had only one public showing of her paintings during her lifetime. Now the Jewish Museum in New York has the first new exhibit of her work in more than 20 years.

Wooooo! 'Second Nature' Is A Winningly Unadorned Memoir Of The Wrestling Life

"Nature Boy" Ric Flair is one of the greatest pro wrestlers of all time. His daughter Charlotte followed him into the ring, and now, they've written a joint memoir that's moving and brutally honest.

Silicon Valley's Ellen Pao Tackles Sex Discrimination, Workplace Diversity In Memoir

The tech investor dives into the lawsuit that thrust her into the national spotlight and the workplace conditions that prompted it. She says firms are largely applying "tepid diversity solutions."

'Landslide' Probes A Mother-Daughter Bond In Spare, Careful Prose

In her new essay collection, Minna Zalman Proctor digs deep into her relationship with her late mother. Her descriptions of her mother are beautiful, though the fragmented writing can feel evasive.

Conversations Between 2 20th-Century Icons Inspires A New Play

Andy Warhol and Truman Capote meant to turn their taped conversations into a play, but both died before they could finish. Now, "WARHOLCAPOTE," a two-man play based on the tapes, hits the stage.

Elizabeth Moss Has A 'Handmaid's Tale' Warning: 'This Could Happen Here'

Hulu's The Handmaid's Tale won eight Emmys on Sunday, including Best Actress for Elisabeth Moss. NPR's Audie Cornish talked to Moss and co-star Samira Wiley when the show premiered this year.

'School For Good And Evil' Is A Kids' Fantasy Series For The Fake News Era

"Good and evil — they mix in the world," says author Soman Chainani. "Both sides claim to be good, both sides claim to be telling the truth." His latest in the series is called Quests for Glory.

At The Emmys, It Was A Big Night For Juggernauts

The Handmaid's Tale, Big Little Lies, Saturday Night Live, Veep and Atlanta all won multiple awards in major categories, on a night that rarely strayed far from current events.

Move Over Millennials, Here Comes 'iGen' ... Or Maybe Not

A new book worries that growing up with smartphones and the Internet has been harmful to a generation of kids. Critic Annalisa Quinn says intergenerational carping is a long, and unhelpful tradition.

Emmy Awards 2017: The Complete List Of Winners

It was a big night for The Handmaid's Tale, across the writing, directing and acting categories.

'Crown Heights' Seeks To Do Justice To A Saga Of Wrongful Conviction

Colin Warner served 20 years for a murder he didn't commit. A childhood friend fought tirelessly to get him exonerated. The story was featured on This American Life and is now the focus of a new film.

Spies, Betrayal, And Some Really Good Food In 'Dinner At The Center Of The Earth'

Nathan Englander's latest tells the fraught history of Israel and Palestine with quotidian details that make the story feel not historically accurate, but historically intimate.

Dolores Huerta: The Civil Rights Icon Who Showed Farmworkers 'Sí Se Puede'

A key architect of the nationwide grape boycott that galvanized the farmworkers' rights movement, her legacy has long been overshadowed. A new film aims to change that. Huerta speaks with NPR.

Move Over Millennials, Here Comes iGen ... Or Maybe Not

A new book worries that growing up with smartphones and the internet has been harmful to a generation of kids. Critic Annalisa Quinn says intergenerational carping is a long, and unhelpful tradition.

Dolores Huerta: The Civil Rights Icon Who Showed Farmworkers 'Si Se Puede'

A key architect of the nationwide grape boycott that galvanized the farmworkers' rights movement, her legacy has long been overshadowed. A new film aims to change that. Huerta speaks with NPR.

'The Taking Of K-129': How The CIA Stole A Sunken Soviet Sub Off The Ocean Floor

Author Josh Dean describes how the CIA worked to secretly resurface a sub that the Soviet Union considered lost. Their cover story involved eccentric billionaire Howard Hughes.

Roald Dahl's Widow Says Charlie From 'The Chocolate Factory' Was Originally Black

Dahl's widow revealed the surprising scoop on the BBC earlier this week.

These 'Far Away Brothers' Remake Themselves In America

Lauren Markham's careful, empathetic new book follows twin brothers from El Salvador, who flee gang violence to make a new life for themselves in a country that's increasingly harsh to immigrants.

In 'Shadowhouse Fall,' Magical Threats Map Real-World Peril

Daniel José Older's new novel continues the adventures of magician Sierra Santiago and her tight-knit band of friends and family as they battle not just unfriendly sorcery but everyday discrimination.

Watch The 2017 Emmy Awards With NPR

NPR's television critic Eric Deggans and The Pop Culture Happy Hour crew will be live-tweeting the ceremony Sunday evening.

Harry Dean Stanton, A Supporting Actor Who Became A Star, Dies At 91

Stanton's weather-beaten face was a fixture on TV and in movies for more than a half-century. He became a cult hero in Repo Man and Paris, Texas — and he had a pretty good singing voice, too.

Self-Aggrandizing, Interminable 'Mother!' Mixes Fantasy And Reality

Writer-director Darren Aronofsky's new film is set in a large country house where a young woman, played by Jennifer Lawrence, finds herself under siege by unwanted guests.

Bruce Springsteen: On Jersey, Masculinity And Wishing To Be His Stage Persona

"People see you onstage and, yeah, I'd want to be that guy," Springsteen says. "I want to be that guy myself very often." Originally broadcast Oct. 5, 2016.

Nobody Takes The Bodega Out Of The Corner. Not Even A Startup

A new startup wants to make these neighborhood stores "obsolete." But for many people, bodegas aren't just about convenience — they feed the spirit of a community.

Cray Crayola

We pick the brightest crayon in the box with this final round in which every answer is also the color of a Crayola crayon. It's "bittersweet," which also happens to be a very nice shade of orange.

Mystery Guest

This episode's mystery guest, Emily Perina, teaches an unusual class for women. Can you solve the mystery before Jonathan and Ophira do?

Talking Heads

TV pundits in absurdly large suits star in this music game. We rewrote Talking Heads songs to be about the hosts, pundits, and game show sidekicks who make their living as talking heads.

Shocking Surprise

In this game, we collected movies with surprise endings and gave them a twist of our own by adding one letter to their titles.

The Sounds Of Failure

In this round, our contestants succeed by failing as they're quizzed on the sounds you hear when you lose or die in various games.

The Instagram Of Dorian Gray

What would've happened if Dr. Jekyll used Grindr and wondered why Mr. Hyde was always zero feet away? We've solved the core plot issues in classic works of fiction using modern solutions.

Julia Stiles: Antihero Of The 'Riviera'

Julia Stiles tells us about playing a female antihero in the new Sundance Now series Riviera, then plays a game inspired by her role in the Bourne films and her love for the singer Morrissey.

40 Nominees Unveiled For The 2017 National Book Awards

Of the names announced by the National Book Foundation, four will take home the literary prize in November. Jesmyn Ward, Jennifer Egan and Frank Bidart number among the longlists' familiar faces.

TV's Property Brothers Share Their Open Plan For Success In 'It Takes Two'

Drew and Jonathan Scott trade chapters, attempting to capture their on-camera rivalry. NPR's Linda Holmes says, "They're dunking on each other, but with Nerf balls. And a plastic hoop. At eye level."

In 'The Pictures,' The Story Slips Out Of Focus

With The Pictures, British author Guy Bolton kicks off a mystery series set in classic-era Hollywood. He's clearly done his research on 1930s America, but sometimes all that detail obscures the story.

Pimps, Porn And Prostitution: Dissecting 'The Deuce'

The gang tackles David Simon's new HBO drama about the rise of the adult-film industry in New York's Times Square. And, as always, What's Making Us Happy this week.

Don't Read This Review Of Darren Aronofsky's Compelling, Confounding 'Mother!'

Critic Chris Klimek thinks you should go into this film about a poet and his submissive wife cold — just be prepared for "squirm-inducing fun."

In Frederick Wiseman's 'Ex Libris,' The New York Public Library Gets Checked Out

The prolific documentary filmmaker's latest project goes behind the stacks to offer a comprehensive, multi-faceted — and overdue — examination of the NYPL as an institution.

'Rat Film': Superb, Formally Inventive Documentary Smells A Rat — And It Is Us

The film examines many facets of Baltimore's social and political history "to drive a pointed, deliberate argument that is still firmly rooted in artistry rather than political message-making."

A College-Bound Lad And His Unbound Dad In 'Brad's Status'

In Mike White's latest film, Ben Stiller plays a middle-aged man so consumed by envy that he fails to grasp how much his emotionally mature son could teach him.

'Call Me By Your Name' Stands Out Among Dozens At Toronto Film Festival

The Toronto International Film Festival wraps up this week and NPR's critics have seen dozens of movies. They provide a sneak peek at films getting early buzz for Oscars, some hidden gems and others to avoid.

Actor Frank Vincent, Who Portrayed Mobsters In 'Goodfellas' And 'The Sopranos,' Dies

Actor Frank Vincent, who was best known for his portrayal of mobsters in Martin Scorsese's, Goodfellas and the HBO series, The Sopranos, has died.

In 'Forest Dark,' A Building In Israel Connects 2 Searching Souls

Nicole Krauss' new novel, Forest Dark, tells two stories concurrently: a man at the end of a financially successful life searching for meaning, and a younger woman writer searching for meaning as her marriage collapses. The only thing that connects them is a building on the other side of the world.

Drummer Grant Hart, Co-Founder Of Punk Band Hüsker Dü, Dies At 56

Drummer Grant Hart co-founded one of the most influential punk bands of all time: Hüsker Dü. Hart played drums and wrote many of the trio's songs. He died of complications from liver cancer and hepatitis C Thursday night at the age of 56.

'Saturday Night Live' Stops Accepting Jokes From Freelancers

Freelancers are a bit of a trade secret when it comes to late night shows. They often send in pages of one-liners for the shows to use or reject. Now Saturday Night Live is telling freelancers it will no longer accept their submissions.

Musician Fred Hersch Recounts A Life 'In And Out Of Jazz' In His New Memoir

Nearly 30 years ago, Hersch was among the first jazz musicians to come out as both gay and HIV positive. His memoir looks back on that time, as well as the time he spent in a medically induced coma.

New Ken Burns Series Remembers Vietnam War Through The Eyes Of Everyday People

Burns made a name for himself by finding the small stories that lend perspective and emotion to larger narratives. Critic David Bianculli says his latest effort is "compelling from the start."

The Wind Still Blows Through The Willows — And Along 'The River Bank'

Kij Johnson works fresh magic with an old story in The River Bank, a sequel to The Wind in the Willows that introduces two new characters, Miss Mole and Miss Rabbit, but keeps the original's charm.