International NY Times : Europe (125)

Europe Edition: Ratko Mladic, Zimbabwe, Manus Island: Your Thursday Briefing

Here’s what you need to know to start your day.

Russia, Turkey and Iran Propose Conference on Postwar Syria’s Future

The conference, to be held in the Russian resort of Sochi, reflected Russia’s increased influence in shaping the outcome of the Syria war.

Naim Suleymanoglu, 50, Dies; Weight Lifting’s ‘Pocket Hercules’

At 4-foot-10, he won three consecutive Olympic gold medals in weight lifting, emerging as a national hero in Turkey.

Rival Factions Battle for Control in Eastern Ukraine

With armored vehicles on streets, civilians fled a showdown between rival Moscow-backed political leaders in the breakaway Luhansk region.

7 In-Depth Articles About Ratko Mladic

The Bosnian Serb former general, convicted of war crimes for the slaughter of Bosnian Muslims, has shaped the region’s image in war and in peace.

7 In-Depth Articles Tracing Ratko Mladic’s Downfall

The Bosnian Serb former general, convicted of war crimes for the slaughter of Bosnian Muslims, has shaped the region’s image in war and in peace.

U.K. Finance Minister Seeks to Placate Angry Young Voters

With Brexit looming large, more-affordable housing featured prominently as Philip Hammond presented his budget to Parliament.

Generations of Jewelry in a Small Italian City

The Carli family has been making and selling its creations since 1655. But soon history could be all that remains.

Europe Edition: Robert Mugabe, Angela Merkel, Syria: Your Wednesday Briefing

Here’s what you need to know to start your day.

Five Places to Shop in San Sebastián, Spain

In the Basque city of San Sebastián, Spain, Gros is a low-key neighborhood behind Zurriola beach that caters to residents, with shops focused on what's local,

Losing London: Where Brexit Hurts: The Nurses and Doctors Leaving London

Britain’s treasured health care system was used as rallying cry by anti-E.U. campaigners. Many of its European staff now feel betrayed. Thousands have quit.

Greece, Looking to Move Past Bailouts, Unveils Ambitious Budget

The country is trying to wean itself off the international assistance that it has relied on in recent years, and is projecting strong economic growth for next year.

Romania Gay Marriage Case Could Have Outsize Impact in Europe

The case addresses whether the American husband of a Romanian man should be afforded residency rights in Romania. But its impact could be felt further afield.

Six of Our Favorite Stories on Germany’s Politics

Some of our recent coverage of Germany and its leader, Angela Merkel, who is now facing an enormous challenge in forming a new government.

Russia, in Reversal, Confirms Radiation Spike

The state weather service in Moscow acknowledged 'extremely high pollution' in a region close to a sprawling Soviet-era nuclear plant.

Germany Arrests 6 Syrian Migrants Suspected of ISIS Links

The detentions fanned fears that extremists posing as asylum seekers were targeting Europe.

Assad and Putin Meet, as Russia Pushes to End Syrian War

Russian officials have said they want the Syrian leader’s support for political reform, but doubts remain about how much Moscow was willing or able to push.

En France, la « révolte » contre le harcèlement sexuel se heurte aux résistances culturelles

De nombreuses personnes en France appellent à faire du harcèlement sexuel une urgence nationale, mais des obstacles légaux et culturels découragent les femmes qui souhaitent porter plainte pour harcèlement sexuel au travail.

ScienceTake: Tricky Cockatoos Match Shapes Better Than Primates

Goffin’s cockatoos, known for their inventiveness, showed a great talent for fitting even complicated shapes into matching holes.

Protesting Coal Mining From a Treehouse

For years, activists have been protesting the expansion of coal mining in the Hambach Forest in Germany by living in treehouses. A court ruling may soon change that.

Europe Edition: Robert Mugabe, North Korea, Angela Merkel: Your Tuesday Briefing

Here’s what you need to know to start your day.

Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip Mark 70 Years of Marriage

Britain’s longest-serving monarch and her husband celebrated with the release of new photographic portraits of the royal couple.

Key European Agencies Move to Continent, Signs of Brexit’s Toll

The relocation of the European Medicines Agency and the European Banking Authority indicate how Britain’s impending exit from the European Union could diminish its economic clout.

Paris Journal: A Brothel, Repurposed and Restored, Reveals Another Paris

Hidden for decades behind crude wooden boards, an ornate ceramic frieze at the former Aux Belles Poules tells a story of the city’s once-thriving sex business

Jana Novotna, Czech Winner of Wimbledon, Dies at 49

Ms. Novotna won a total of 17 Grand Slam titles, 16 of them in doubles and mixed doubles. The tribulations of her singles career, however, came to define her.

Europe Edition: Zimbabwe, Angela Merkel, Charles Manson: Your Monday Briefing

Here’s what you need to know to start your day.

Spain’s Attorney General, Leading Catalan Prosecution, Falls Ill and Dies

The death of José Manuel Maza in a hospital in Argentina deprives Spain of its top prosecutor in the case against separatist Catalan leaders.

Gerry Adams, Irish Republican Leader, to Step Down From Sinn Fein

After more than 30 years leading the nationalist party, the divisive politician says he will pass the baton next year.

News Analysis: At Bonn Climate Talks, Stakes Get Higher in Gamble on Planet’s Future

This year’s United Nations climate talks have wrapped up, and there were few signs that countries are inclined to take urgent action.

New Analysis: At Bonn Climate Talks, Stakes Get Higher in Gamble on Planet’s Future

This year’s United Nations climate talks have wrapped up, and there were few signs that countries are inclined to take urgent action.

Slavery Ensnares Thousands in U.K. Here’s One Teenage Girl’s Story.

Across Britain, vulnerable adults and children — both citizens and migrants — have become victims of modern slavery. A teenager trapped by a drug gang tells what happened to her.

Jeremy Hutchinson, a Top Lawyer in High-Profile Cases, Dies at 102

As a leading British barrister he defended Penguin Books for publishing D.H. Lawrence’s 'Lady Chatterley’s Lover,' which had been banned as indecent.

The Saturday Profile: Sweden’s Proponent of ‘Feminist Foreign Policy,’ Shaped by Abuse

As foreign minister, Margot Wallstrom, who broke free from a violent relationship in her 20s, is challenging assumptions in a traditionally male sphere.

For This Hero, It’s O.K. to Just Throw Him a Bone

A Belgian Malinois dog called Mali has received Britain’s highest award for animal valor for his actions during an intense firefight in Afghanistan.

Angela Merkel’s Coalition Talks in Germany Go Into Overtime

The German chancellor and representatives of three other parties are expected to work into the weekend after contentious talks ended in deadlock.

In Italy, a Neo-Fascist Party’s Small Win Creates Big Unease

CasaPound won a seat in a Roman municipal election, raising fears that Italy may be joining the ranks of countries where the far right is rising.

Europe Edition: Zimbabwe, Saudi Arabia, Ryanair: Your Friday Briefing

Here’s what you need to know to start your day.

Norway’s Wealth Fund Considers Divesting From Oil Shares

The move signals that the country, Europe’s top producer, does not have full confidence in oil’s future.

Grenfell Tower Fire Killed 71, British Police Say

The official toll, which was lower than first estimated, was announced after the last victims in the West London blaze were identified.

Sausage Roll Jesus Creates Heartburn for U.K. Bakery Firm

To promote an advent calendar, Greggs stirred outrage with a Nativity scene in which the infant Jesus was replaced by a flaky sausage roll.

New Quay Journal: A Cliff-Edge Town Visited by Poets, Dolphins — and Octopuses

Octopuses and giant barrel jellyfish come and go in a town where Wales’s best-known alcoholic drank. The dolphins seem to be staying, so far.

Jet Pilot Might Not Seem Like a ‘Gig,’ but at Ryanair, It Is

The biggest European budget airline employs many of its pilots as contract workers — many of whom are pushing back after a recent flight cancellation episode erupted into a clash.

Europe Edition: Zimbabwe, Saad Hariri, Leonardo da Vinci: Your Thursday Briefing

Here’s what you need to know to start your day.

European Union Chastises Poland, and Draws a Sharp Rebuke

The European Parliament might suspend Poland’s voting rights in the E.U. It would be the most serious rift yet with Warsaw’s right-wing leaders.

Greece Offers Bond Swap in a Charge Toward Financial Freedom

The proposed bond conversion could help ease a staggering debt burden that at one point threatened to push Greece out of the eurozone.

Of Pints and Predators: Inside the U.K. Parliament’s Boozy Hangouts

The clubs and bars frequented by lawmakers and aides are at the heart of the sexual harassment scandal that has engulfed Westminster.

Signs of Russian Meddling in Brexit Referendum

Researchers have found evidence that Russian-language or Kremlin-linked Twitter accounts pushed divisive messages in British politics, too

Outskirts of Athens Hit by Deadly Flash Floods

At least 15 people have died after torrential rains in Greece, the latest country to be ravaged by lethal weather.

Russia May Make All Outside News Media Register as ‘Foreign Agents’

The measure is said to be a response to a U.S. requirement imposed on the state-owned RT television network, but it is far broader in scope.

Holocaust Artist’s Legacy Is Contested in Germany

Rosemarie Koczy, whose works memorialized genocide victims, was accused by archivists of faking a past in Nazi concentration camps.