EurActive (185)

Waiting for May, Brussels eyes December Brexit deal

When Theresa May visits Brussels tomorrow , EU negotiators will be listening intently for signs the British prime minister is preparing to risk a domestic backlash and raise her offer to secure a Brexit deal in December.

Tusk confirms December summit on future of eurozone will be held

A summit of euro zone leaders will go ahead as planned in the middle of December, the chairman of European Union leaders said yesterday , dispelling speculation it might be postponed because of the collapse of German coalition talks.

Hogan pleased with Greek efforts to close 'digital gap' in rural areas

EU Agriculture Commissioner Phil Hogan is satisfied with the Greek government's push for rural broadband, claiming that it will help farmers increase production.

French dams' days numbered after demolition decision

Two large dams on a river in northern France will be demolished after the French government finally signed off on a long-gestating plan to free up the waterway, in a decision welcomed by environmental groups and lauded as "unique in Europe" by Paris.

MEPs amp up pressure on Commission over digital trade

MEPs are exerting pressure on the European Commission to draw up rules on data flows in foreign trade agreements, an area where the EU executive has so far not pinned down any tangible policy.

Balancing secrecy and openness, the EU strives for transparency

EU laws go through a roller-coaster of opacity, with lawmaking only becoming visible in some parts of the process. But a new regime could extend this transparency from conception to birth.

Commission ready to boost cash support in humanitarian aid

The European Commission is aiming to boost the proportion of humanitarian aid it hands out as cash. But most payments are actually made by banking cards very similar to regular ATM cards.

Creativity is the new mantra in development aid

The lines defining aid have become increasingly blurred in recent years. Reluctance among donor countries to hit the 0.7% target, has led them to get creative.

Chizhov: Syria is almost settled, time for EU to step in

In a wide-ranging interview on Wednesday , Russia's ambassador to the EU discussed Syria and other conflicts, the upcoming Eastern Partnership Summit, his country's relations with Turkey and Bulgaria's Presidency of the Council of the EU.

France calls urgent UN meeting over Libya slavery

France on Wednesday called an emergency meeting of the UN Security Council over slave-trading in Libya as President Emmanuel Macron blasted the auctioning of Africans as a crime against humanity.

Time to re-energise Europe

Europe must not stand still and the Leaders Agenda is a step in the right direction. But we must seize the current window of opportunity to re-energise the EU by tackling multiple issues at once, argue Herman Van Rompuy and Janis A. Emmanouilidis.

Poland shakes off coal-dependency stereotypes

Poland has been steadily growing its share of renewable energies in an effort to decarbonise its economy, challenging stereotypes that paint it as the coal-addict of Europe. However, the deployment of renewables appears to have come to a halt since the 2015 peak.

A low-key Eastern Partnership Summit

Instead of grand declarations, a low-key Eastern Partnership Summit focusing on concrete deliverables can be just what both the EU and the EaP countries need, write Igor Merheim-Eyre and Katarzyna Sobieraj.

Cash and non-cash assistance in humanitarian aid and development

Some 125 million people worldwide are currently dependent on emergency aid as a consequence of war, instability, inequality and natural disasters.

A national list for European elections gains momentum in France

All the political families consulted by the French presidency seem to favour a national list to replace regional ballots for the 2019 European elections, with the exception of some centre-right deputies. EURACTIV France reports.

A European view of Trump's China visit

The 'America First' policy of Donald Trump leaves a big window of opportunity for the EU in Asia, writes Geoffrey Harris.

Multi-country research proves great impact of entrepreneurship education

The ICEE is a multi-country research project and large field trial on the impact of entrepreneurship education programmes, such as mini-companies in schools.

Cohesion funds can stop Europe from moving at different speeds

Cross-border and inter-regional cooperation in cohesion and research & development spending is still limited, but very much needed to prevent a multi-speed Europe writes Lambert van Nistelrooij. To unlock Europe's growth opportunities, the MEP calls for smart regional specialisation and an ...

Lawmaking in the dark

The image of unelected bureaucrats making secret deals in smoke-filled rooms has gained traction in recent years, fueling populist resentment towards the European Union.

Commission calls for reforms to address wage stagnation

The European Commission told member states on Wednesday to prioritize policies that support wage growth, in light of the economic pain still suffered by many Europeans.

The Brief: Talanoa dialogue, a poison pill for Poland

If anything came out of the COP23 in Bonn, it's a poison pill. At least for Poland. The coal addicted country will host the next summit in December 2018 in Katowice: an old coal mining town. But many climate change activists do not enjoy the irony of this situation.

EU lighting up Africa with solar

Nearly €340 billion of investment will be needed to achieve universal access to electricity across Africa by 2030, the World Energy Network forecasts. That is a tall order. The combined grid capacity of the 48 sub-Saharan African countries is around 70 gigawatts, roughly equivalent to that of ...

Post-Jamaica collapse: Germany's EU policymaking clout on the back-burner

After talks between Germany's four main political parties collapsed, the acting government's capacity to participate in EU-level decisions is limited. But important progress still needs to be made to pursue the reform process within the EU. EURACTIV Germany reports.

Commission told Hungary how to win approval for Russia-backed nuclear plant   

The European Commission assisted Hungary in finding the right loophole to the EU public procurement rules to get the 'green-light' for the construction of the Russian-backed Paks II nuclear power plant, according to internal documents seen by this website.

Ex-Bosnian Serb commander Mladic convicted to life in prison for genocide

A U.N. tribunal convicted on Wednesday former Bosnian Serb military commander Ratko Mladic of genocide and crimes against humanity committed in Bosnia, including Europe's biggest massacre since World War II, and sentenced him to life in prison.

Smart interconnectivity: towards a sustainable and integrated Europe

In a blog about the new European Commission expert group report Towards a sustainable and integrated Europe', Michal Smyk calls for a change in the way we think about smart grid interconnectivity.

MEPs divided on the citizens' initiative to ban glyphosate

More than a million European citizens have signed a petition to ban glyphosate, a pesticide classed as a probable carcinogen. In the face of European concerns, MEPs are divided. EURACTIV France reports.

Next German government must not fight for right to pollute

The next German government must embrace EU protections rather than fight for the right to pollute, insists Christian Schaible.

The role of teachers and school heads in improving Vocational Education and Training

The European Trade Union Committee for Education is pleased to announce the forthcoming public hearing on The role of teachers and school heads in improving the status of Vocational Education and Training".

Tying up the whole food supply chain to help farmers - where is the beef?

Legislating against unfair trading practices in the agri-food sector would ultimately push up prices and cause farmers and consumers to lose out, writes Christian Verschueren.

Disgraceful behaviour by the EU at high-level tuna meeting in Marrakesh

While claiming to fight for the oceans and put sustainability first, the European Commission is pushing for the largest total allowable catches of bluefin tuna ever seen, without a solid scientific basis, write Linnéa Engström, Ricardo Serrão Santos and Norica Nicolai.

Lack of German government puts eurozone integration plans on hold

The collapse of talks on a new German government means that the eurozone's ambitious plans for deeper economic integration could be put on hold, officials said on Tuesday .

Berlusconi takes his comeback bid to Europe rights court

Italy's scandal-plagued former prime minister Silvio Berlusconi today takes his comeback bid to the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg, asking it to weigh in on his ban from holding elected office.

MPs: UK made grave errors over Hinkley nuclear project

Britain made "grave strategic errors" in its handling of the Franco-Chinese Hinkley Point nuclear project, a critical parliamentary report concluded on Wednesday .

UK lawmakers vote against retaining EU Charter of Fundamental Rights after Brexit

The UK Prime Minister narrowly avoided defeat in Parliament after a slim majority of MPs voted late on Tuesday  against retaining the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights after Brexit.

Reversing negative trends in the EU's neighbourhood policy

With the Eastern Partnership Summit this Friday and the Bulgarian Presidency in January 2018, the EU is at a juncture where it can reverse a very negative trend and breathe new life in its neighbourhood policy, Harry Nedelcu writes.

Agri-food industries highlight risks of hard Brexit, demand clarity

The EU's food and drink industry has joined forces with farmers and agri-food traders to call for a smooth Brexit transition and highlight the damage a cliff-edge EU exit would do to the bloc's food chain.

Brexit impact on energy markets could be 'limited', study says

Brexit could have a limited effect on energy markets in both the United Kingdom and the European Union, according to a new study that is optimistic about the future of energy policy. But the Court of Auditors has warned that experimental energy research could suffer

An agenda for Germany's ecological modernisation

No matter which parties will eventually form a coalition, Germany's next government will continue with an agenda of ecological modernisation, writes Arne Jungjohann. Based  on exploratory coalition talks, he explains how such an agenda could look like.

EIB banking on new business in East Africa

Offering credit to East African banks might not be many people's idea of traditional development aid. Yet promoting private small and medium enterprise, alongside funding for infrastructure projects that will help develop local businesses, lies at the heart of the new strategy for Africa.

EU auditors insist on full probe into ECB's role in Greek bailouts

The European Court of Auditors insists it had the right to look into the role of the European Central Bank in Greek bailouts, based on the Lisbon Treaty and a European Parliament resolution, and is now seeking ways to access the documents the ECB has refused to hand over.

Mugabe resigns, ending 37-year reign over Zimbabwe

Robert Mugabe resigned as Zimbabwe's president yesterday , finally swept from power as his 37-year reign of autocratic control and brutality crumbled within days of a military takeover.

Russian blackmail in the Council of Europe?

The Council of Europe could become the first European institution to lift sanctions imposed on Russia for annexing Crimea and military aggression in Eastern Ukraine. This would be a major blow to democratic values on the European continent, write Volodymyr Yermolenko and Sergiy Sydorenko.

Poland reacts coolly to EU court warning of fines for logging

Poland reacted coolly to a warning it could incur fines for continuing to log in the Białowieża forest, a UNESCO World Heritage site, saying on Tuesday its actions were lawful.

The Brief: More coin-tossing, please

Yesterday the Council agreed to send the EU's Medicines Agency to Amsterdam and its Banking Authority to Paris. The results were hardly a shock but the process was an eye-opener.

Africa's young people need inspirational leaders, not old autocrats

Investing in youth is essential for Africa's future, but what's even more essential is to let inspirational and transformational leaders to come forth, writes Shada Islam.

Legal Affairs MEPs approve watered down broadcasting rules

MEPs in the European Parliament's Legal Affairs Committee have approved a watered down version of an EU proposal that will regulate how much content broadcasters must show online.

Tackling youth unemployment and the skills gap

EU and business leaders are very keen to address the high levels of youth unemployment and the emerging skills gap across Europe by offering young people opportunities to play an active role in the European economy, writes Stefan Crets.

What's your beef? Mercosur trade talks falter

A battle over beef between the European Union and Argentina and Brazil could push trade talks beyond a year-end deadline and lead to further years of delay.

Vestager: EU will act if OECD fails on taxing internet giants

The European Union will take measures to tax US tech giants if the international community doesn't agree to a new system early next year, Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager said on Tuesday .