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US probes unusual rise in humpback whale deaths.

Investigators are probing an unusually high number of humpback whale deaths since 2016 off the US Atlantic Coast, where many appear to have been killed by colliding with boats, officials said Thursday.

- PhysOrg - NL

Image: Cygnus spacecraft approaches ISS in the sunset.

On Saturday April 22, 2017, Expedition 51 Flight Engineer Thomas Pesquet of the European Space Agency photographed Orbital ATK's Cygnus spacecraft as it approached the International Space Station.

- PhysOrg - NL

Cassini shoots through the gap between Saturn and its rings, returning the closest views ever of the planet.

On the first of 22 scheduled dives between Saturn and its innermost rings yesterday, Cassini zoomed at 77,000 miles per hour to within 1,900 miles of the planet's cloud tops — and emerged intact. After re-establishing contact with ground controllers very early Thursday morning, the spacecraft began returning the ...

- Discover - US

'Minibrains' In A Dish Shed A Little Light On Autism And Epilepsy.

Experiments with small clusters of networked brain cells are helping scientists see how real brains develop normally, and what goes awry when cells have trouble making connections.

- NPR - US

The Victorians taught children about consumerism – and we can learn from them too.

oneinchpunch / Shutterstock.comEvery parent dreads the day their child asks where babies come from. But perhaps we should be more concerned about how children learn where other things come from. What do we say when they ask where we get the clothes we wear, the furniture in our homes, the food we eat? Considering the volume ...

- The Conversation - UK

Researchers find alarming NOx-emissions from diesel cars.

By now, it's no secret: the certification requirements for cars in the EU and in Switzerland have precious little to do with the cars' actual exhaust emissions on the roads. The "real" exhaust emissions are, therefore, determined in separate studies, including at Empa. Air pollution control experts from the Federal Office ...

- PhysOrg - NL

Astronomers made first measurements of small-scale ripples in primeval hydrogen gas using rare double quasars.

The most barren regions known are the far-flung corners of intergalactic space. In these vast expanses between the galaxies there is just one solitary atom per cubic meter—a diffuse haze of hydrogen gas left over from the Big Bang. On the largest scales, this material is arranged in a vast network of filamentary ...

- PhysOrg - NL

Electric shocks could help you perfect your running technique.

FootStriker uses electrical muscle stimulation to improve your running style – and early tests suggest that it might have a big impact

- NewScientist - US

Discovery in northern lakes may be key to understanding early life on Earth.

A team of researchers has discovered that many Canadian lakes can provide new insights into ancient oceans, and their findings could advance research about greenhouse gas emissions, harmful algal blooms, and early life forms.

- PhysOrg - NL

Neanderthals in California? Maybe so, provocative study says.

A startling new report asserts that the first known Americans arrived much, much earlier than scientists thought _ more than 100,000 years ago

- Yahoo! News - US

'Whispering' Whales: Humpback Calves Speak Softly to Mom.

A newborn humpback whale learns early in life to use its "indoor voice" to avoid attracting the attention of nearby killer whales.

- Livescience.com - US

How to usher in an AI future with gain rather than pain

The consent of the people will be needed if the machine learning revolution is to succeed, says Paul Marks

- NewScientist - US

Image of the Day

A Cygnus cargo ship named after the late NASA astronaut John Glenn is seen orbiting above Earth's clouds as it approaches the International Space Station.

- Space.com - US

Resource availability drives person-to-person variations in microbes living in the body

The collection of microbial species found in the human body varies from person to person, and new research published in PLOS Computational Biology suggests that a significant part of this variation can be explained by variability in shared resources available to the microbes.

- PhysOrg - NL

New method for producing PET radiotracers in higher radiochemical yields

ANSTO researchers have led the development of a new method for producing PET radiotracers. The discovery utilises the transition metal rhenium to promote fluorine-18 radiolabelling under aqueous, low temperature conditions.

- PhysOrg - NL

Cassini Saturn Probe Survives 1st 'Grand Finale' Dive

NASA's Cassini spacecraft has survived its first plunge between Saturn's cloud tops and the giant planet's innermost rings, a region that no probe had ever explored before.

- Space.com - US

Ice cave in Transylvania yields window into region's past

Ice cores drilled from a glacier in a cave in Transylvania offer new evidence of how Europe's winter weather and climate patterns fluctuated during the last 10,000 years, known as the Holocene period.

- PhysOrg - NL

Cassini spacecraft phones home after daring Saturn encounter

NASA's Cassini spacecraft is back in contact after shooting through the gap between Saturn and its rings

- CBS NEWS - US

California fossils, stone tools may rewrite New World human history

WASHINGTON - In what may be one of the most significant discoveries ever in archeology in the Americas, researchers on Wednesday said stone tools and broken mastodon bones unearthed in California show humans had reached the Americas by about 130,000 years ago, far earlier than previously known.

- Reuters - US

Recently discovered solar system could seed life between adjacent exoplanets

After NASA announced in February the discovery of a solar system with seven planets—three of which were deemed potentially habitable—UChicago postdoctoral scholar Sebastiaan Krijt began wondering: If a life form existed on one of these planets, could space debris carry it to another?

- PhysOrg - NL

Rita Colwell, world-renowned microbiologist and science leader, to receive the Vannevar Bush Award

The National Science Board is pleased to announce that Rita Rossi Colwell, distinguished university professor at the University of Maryland College Park and at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, senior advisor and chairman emeritus at Canon U.S. Life Sciences, Inc., and founder and chairman at ...

- National Science Foundation - US

Oysters hold secrets to Chesapeake Bay's past

People began to negatively impact the water quality of the Chesapeake Bay earlier than previously thought, a new study finds.

- PhysOrg - NL

Researchers found the body of a 25-foot-long shark, and it's grim but strangely beautiful

Last week, the Marine Strandings Network was called in to investigate a dead shark in Cornwall, England. What MSN found was not just any shark: it was the fully intact floating carcass of a 25-foot-long basking shark. SEE ALSO: If footage of this ethereal jellyfish doesn't calm you, nothing will Photographer Matthew Facey ...

- Yahoo! News - US

Fukomys livingstoni, I presume?

Two new species of African mole-rat have been discovered by researchers at Queen Mary University of London , together with colleagues in Tanzania and at the University of Pretoria.

- PhysOrg - NL

Ohio zoo euthanizes 29-year-old polar bear that had cancer

The Columbus Zoo and Aquarium in Ohio says it has euthanized a 29-year-old male polar bear after veterinarians determined he had liver cancer with limited treatment options.

- PhysOrg - NL

This fantastic idea for a circular runway is sadly going nowhere

NLR/Endless RunwayBuilding a new runway is often a tight squeeze. For example, part of the opposition to a new runway in London, which has provoked national debate, comes from the hundreds of families whose homes will be demolished to make way for the airport expansion. But a team of Dutch scientists have now come up with ...

- The Conversation - UK

Legal marijuana stores lead to increases in property crime: study

Legal marijuana shops are linked to higher levels of property crime in nearby areas, according to a nearly three-year study in Denver.

- PhysOrg - NL

From pedicures to the Peregrine rocket, paraffin wax proves its worth

Your candles, crayons, and pedicures have something in common with a revolutionary aerospace engineering project from NASA and Stanford University. The paraffin wax used in familiar, everyday products and pampering is also what fuels the Peregrine hybrid rocket motor.

- PhysOrg - NL

American Physical Society and CERN sign an open access agreement for SCOAP3

The American Physical Society and The European Organization for Nuclear Research , as the Host Organization of SCOAP3 , are pleased to announce that they have entered into an agreement to publish high-energy physics articles in three leading journals of the APS - Physical Review Letters, Physical Review D, and Physical ...

- PhysOrg - NL

Three receive 2016-17 Edward A. Dickson Emeritus Professorship Award

The award is funded by a gift endowment established by the late Edward A. Dickson, a UC regent from 1913 to 1946, to honor outstanding UCLA emeriti for research, scholarly work, teaching and service.

- UCLA - US

Fact Check: Do six million people earn less than the living wage?

via shutterstock.com I'm angry and fed up with the way in which six million people earn less than the living wage. Jeremy Corbyn, leader of the Labour Party, interviewed on the BBC's Andrew Marr show on April 23. To assess this claim by Jeremy Corbyn, distinguishing various low-wage floors is important. In 2017, the Living ...

- The Conversation - UK

NASA study challenges long-held tsunami formation theory

A new NASA study is challenging a long-held theory that tsunamis form and acquire their energy mostly from vertical movement of the seafloor.

- PhysOrg - NL

Report confirms serious challenges for rivers

New Zealand’s rivers and lakes are under increasing pressure, according to the latest national report from the Ministry for the Environment and Stats NZ about the state of fresh water.

- Scoop NZ - NZ

Cassini's Journey into the Unknown: NASA Engineer Talks Saturn Risks & Rewards

Space.com talked with Joan Stupik about the risks of that first pass between the planet and rings and what scientists hope to learn over the course of its unprecedented journey.

- Space.com - US

For first time, researchers measure forces that align crystals and help them snap together

Like two magnets being pulled toward each other, tiny crystals twist, align and slam into each other, but due to an altogether different force. For the first time, researchers have measured the force that draws them together and visualized how they swivel and align.

- PhysOrg - NL

Scientists develop fluid-filled artificial womb to help premature babies

LONDON, - Scientists in the United States have developed a fluid-filled womb-like bag known as an extra-uterine support device that could transform care for extremely premature babies, significantly improving chances of survival.

- Reuters - US

Study: mothers are less wealthy than women without children

Having children can drastically change women's economic and financial status. kathrinpie/pixabayThe direct and indirect costs of having children can be high and, in many societies, women most often shoulder these costs. In a recent research study, we measured the gender-specific economic impact of parenthood in Germany. Our ...

- The Conversation - UK

New report reinforces need for urgent action on rivers

Forest & Bird is calling for a comprehensive government package to restore our declining rivers and lakes, in the face of overwhelming evidence that they are in serious trouble.

- Scoop NZ - NZ

With Google's help, psychologist tackles 'black troublemaker' school stereotype

As a boy in Memphis, Tennessee, Jason Okonofua tagged along behind his two protective older brothers, even when they got into schoolyard brawls. By 10th grade he had attended a half-dozen schools, getting suspended four times and expelled once.

- PhysOrg - NL

Primeval forest risks sparking new EU-Poland clash

The EU warned Poland on Thursday it may take legal action to stop logging in a UNESCO World Heritage forest, risking a new clash with Warsaw's right-wing government.

- PhysOrg - NL

Samsung, Apple keep top spots in smartphone market

Samsung and Apple maintained their leadership in the smartphone market in early 2017 while Chinese-based Huawei's strong growth cemented its number three position, a market tracker said Thursday.

- PhysOrg - NL

Trump not the only commander-in-chief to flex presidential muscle

Because of his shortage of Capitol Hill contacts and his complete lack of experience in wrangling legislation, Trump may feel more tempted — or obliged — than previous presidents to try and cram his agenda through by executive fiat, the panelists said.

- UCLA - US

Underwater debris is clouding hopes for sustainable deep-sea mining

Treasure troves of raw materials are resting on the ocean floor and their potential abundance is driving the emergence of deep-sea mining, and throwing up concerns about the environmental impact.

- PhysOrg - NL

With Google's help, psychologist tackles 'black troublemaker' school stereotype

Empathy intervention combats knee-jerk suspensions, expulsions of African American teens

- UC Berkeley - US

British government loses court case over air pollution plans

Britain's government must publish proposals to tackle air pollution months earlier than it wanted, a top court ruled Thursday, saying the plans cannot be delayed until after June's general election.

- PhysOrg - NL

Scythian horse breeding unveiled: Lessons for animal domestication

Nomad Scythian herders roamed vast areas spanning the Central Asian steppes during the Iron Age, approximately from the 9th to the 1st century BCE . These livestock pastoralists, who lived on wagons covered by tents, left their mark in the history of warfare for their exceptional equestrian skills. They were among the first ...

- PhysOrg - NL

Artificial wombs could increase premature babies' chances of survival

Researchers at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia have developed artificial wombs that could eventually increase premature babies' chances of survival. Dr. Arthur Caplan from NYU School of Medicine joins CBSN to explain how this technology could combat serious the effects that can result from preterm birth.

- CBS NEWS - US

Quake hazard to the South from Akatore Fault hard to assess

One of the closest active geological faults to Dunedin is not giving up its secrets easily. That is worrying when it comes to assessing the potential earthquake hazard the Akatore Fault poses to residents in Dunedin and around the region.

- Scoop NZ - NZ

Computational research details the activation mechanism of p38-alpha

The protein p38α is a member of a family of molecules that transmit outside signals throughout the cell, thus allowing for an appropriate cell response, such as proliferation, differentiation, senescence, or death. Moreover, the participation of p38α in pathological conditions, like chronic inflammatory diseases and ...

- PhysOrg - NL

New Evidence Suggests Humans Arrived In The Americas Far Earlier Than Thought

Until now, the earliest signs of humans in the Americas dated back about 15,000 years. But new research puts people in California 130,000 years ago. Experts are wondering whether to believe it.

- NPR - US