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Scientists determine source of world's largest mud eruption.

On May 29, 2006, mud started erupting from several sites on the Indonesian island of Java. Boiling mud, water, rocks and gas poured from newly-created vents in the ground, burying entire towns and compelling many Indonesians to flee. By September 2006, the largest eruption site reached a peak, and enough mud gushed on the ...

- PhysOrg - NL

Saving the Endangered Cuban Crocodile.

Hybridization poses an increasing threat to the nation’s beloved reptile --

- Scientific American - US

What next for Amazon studio?.

As the head of Amazon's entertainment studio since 2014, Roy Price was tasked with shaping the e-retailer into a major player in the film and TV world.

- PhysOrg - NL

Rain, winds help tame wildfires in Spain and Portugal.

Overnight rain and winds helped firefighters tame wildfires that devoured homes and people in their cars, leaving 36 dead in Portugal with four also killed in blazes in northern Spain. Portugal's civil protection agency said Tuesday that the 15 biggest fires had been brought under control, adding that seven people were ...

- Yahoo! News - US

North American first: Researchers publish scientific study on cannabis production.

University of Guelph researchers have published what is believed to be the first scientific paper in North America on improving medicinal cannabis plant production, helping move the industry into the realm of high-tech laboratories and evidence-based practices.

- PhysOrg - NL

A new era of multi-messenger astronomy with LIGO discovery.

Rochester NY Oct 16, 2017 Rochester Institute of Technology researchers played a significant role in an international announcement today that has changed the future of astrophysics. The breakthrough discovery of colliding neutron stars marks the first time both gravitational waves and light have been detected from the same ...

- SpaceDaily.com - US

New examination of occupational licensing contradicts decades of research.

From doctors to engineers to carpet layers to massage therapists, more than one in three Americans is required to hold a license to work in their occupation. Broad consensus among researchers holds that licensure creates wage premiums by establishing economic monopolies, but according to Northwestern University research, ...

- PhysOrg - NL

Tropical beetles face extinction threat.

Climate change is putting many tropical high altitude beetles at risk of extinction, warn an international team of scientists.

- PhysOrg - NL

Amazonian hunters deplete wildlife but don't empty forests.

Conservationists can be "cautiously optimistic" about the prospect of sustainable subsistence hunting by Amazonian communities - according to new research from the University of East Anglia.

- PhysOrg - NL

Fire crews protect observatory on Southern California peak.

A dozen aircraft dropped water and fire retardant as crews worked in steep terrain Tuesday to battle a blaze near an historic observatory and communications towers on Mount Wilson northeast of Los Angeles.

- PhysOrg - NL

Dutch open 'world's first 3D-printed bridge'.

Dutch officials toasted on Tuesday the opening of what is being called the world's first 3D-printed concrete bridge, which is primarily meant to be used by cyclists.

- PhysOrg - NL

Scientists create most powerful micro-scale bio-solar cell yet

Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have created a micro-scale biological solar cell that generates a higher power density for longer than any existing cell of its kind.

- PhysOrg - NL

World first for reading digitally encoded synthetic molecules

For the first time ever, using mass spectrometry, researchers have successfully read several bytes of data recorded on a molecular scale using synthetic polymers. Their work sets a new benchmark for the amount of data -- stored as a sequence of molecular units -- that may be read using this routine method. It also sets the ...

- ScienceDaily - US

Origami lattice paves the way for new noise-dampening barriers on the road

Managing traffic noise pollution has vexed researchers in large part because of the broad range of frequencies we encounter on the road. Currently, only heavy, wall-like barriers can effectively dampen all of these various sounds.

- PhysOrg - NL

Tracing the origin of Indonesian people through genetics

I try to learn who are the ancestors of Indonesian people through genetics. The genetics of Indonesian people are a mix between different groups of humans.

- The Conversation - UK

Watching plant photosynthesis from space

Sydney, Australia Oct 16, 2017 University of Sydney and NASA researchers have developed a revolutionary new technique to image plant photosynthesis using satellite-based remote-sensing, with potential applications in climate change monitoring. The uptake of carbon dioxide by leaves and its conversion to sugars by ...

- SpaceDaily.com - US

Sleeping too little is no badge of honour – it harms our brains

Skipping sleep to get more done can have a profound effect. We need to prioritise rest before we sleepwalk into a public health disaster

- NewScientist - US

Novel mechanism of resistance to anti-cancer drugs

Investigators have discovered a novel non-genetic cause of resistance to the targeted anti-cancer therapy cetuximab. Their findings suggest a strategy for overcoming this resistance.

- ScienceDaily - US

Assessment shows metagenomics software has much room for improvement

A recent critical assessment of software tools represents a key step toward taming the 'Wild West' nature of the burgeoning field of metagenomics.

- ScienceDaily - US

Mimetic Martian water is highly pressurized, experiments show

Washington Oct 13, 2017 Mars is too cold to host flowing liquid water, but with the right mix of compounds, a water solution could be hiding on and below Mars' surface. New research suggests a solution dubbed "mimetic Martian water" could flow on and beneath the Red Planet's crust. Such a solution could explain the ...

- SpaceDaily.com - US

Study reshapes understanding of climate change's impact on early societies

A new study linking paleoclimatology -- the reconstruction of past global climates -- with historical analysis shows a link between environmental stress and its impact on the economy, political stability, and war-fighting capacity of ancient Egypt.

- ScienceDaily - US

Force field analysis provides clues to protein-ion interaction

Muscle twitching, lactose digestion, blood movement—what could possibly connect these body functions? You may be surprised to learn that all these processes and many more are driven by metal ions.

- PhysOrg - NL

Airbnb rentals boom across Africa

Rent-a-room giant Airbnb said Tuesday that it had provided accommodation for 1.2 million visitors to Africa over the last year—double the previous year as tourism expands across the continent.

- PhysOrg - NL

Stunning photo of Jupiter and two of its biggest moons

Two of Jupiter's largest and most intriguing moons hover near the giant planet in a striking photo snapped by NASA's Juno spacecraft .

- FOX News - US

Active sieving could improve dialysis and water purification filters

Physicists from École Normale Supérieure and Paris Science and Letters University in France have proven theoretically that active sieving, as opposed to its passive counterpart, can improve the separation abilities of filtration systems. These new views on how active sieving could improve systems such as those used in ...

- PhysOrg - NL

Millions live and die in pain due to morphine stigma

Millions needlessly live and die in pain because of misinformation and stigma around palliatives, says new study.

- SciDev.net - UK

Proteins and polymers: Spinning strands hint at folding dynamics

Scientists have created flexible strings of magnetized beads to model how natural and synthetic strands bend and fold in dynamic conditions. The work could enhance knowledge of how proteins and DNA fold in biological systems and how synthetic fibers interact in fluids.

- ScienceDaily - US

What training exercise boosts brain power best? New research finds out

One of the two brain-training methods most scientists use in research is significantly better in improving memory and attention. It also results in more significant changes in brain activity.

- ScienceDaily - US

Scientists create most powerful micro-scale bio-solar cell yet

Researchers have created a micro-scale biological solar cell that generates a higher power density for longer than any existing cell of its kind.

- ScienceDaily - US

Haumea, the most peculiar of Pluto companions, has a ring around it

Granada, Spain Oct 17, 2017 At the ends of the Solar System, beyond the orbit of Neptune, there is a belt of objects composed of ice and rocks, among which four dwarf planets stand out: Pluto, Eris, Makemake and Haumea. The latter is the least well known of the four and was recently the object of an international ...

- SpaceDaily.com - US

Google to offer stepped-up security for 'high risk' users

Google said Tuesday it would offer stronger online security for "high risk" users who may be frequent targets of online attacks.

- PhysOrg - NL

Astronaut Scott Kelly: Survival skills for long-term spac...

NASA Commander Scott Kelly , 'Endurance: A Year in Space, a Lifetime of Discovery' author, talks about the effects on the human body of spending a long time in space, the future of space exploration and funding private space trips.

- Yahoo! News - US

Preservation for the ages

Researchers working with classicists and computer scientists have developed a method to preserve digital humanities databases. The preservation strategy allows scholars to re-launch a database application in a variety of environments -- from individual computers, to virtual machines, to future web servers -- without ...

- ScienceDaily - US

'Hiding in plain sight:' Discovery raises questions over scale of overlooked biodiversity

Scientists have used cutting edge DNA technology to demonstrate that one of Europe's top freshwater predators is actually two species rather than one.

- ScienceDaily - US

Study shows how water could have flowed on 'cold and icy' ancient Mars

Research by planetary scientists finds that periodic melting of ice sheets on a cold early Mars would have created enough water to carve the ancient valleys and lakebeds seen on the planet today.

- ScienceDaily - US

FAST Feature: No aliens found yet, but heartbeats of a universe heard

Beijing Oct 17, 2017 One is rapid and strong, and the other is slow and weak, like the heartbeats of a youth and an old man passing through a distance of thousands of light years, and then heard by the most sensitive "ear" on Earth. The "ear" is the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Telescope , the world's largest radio ...

- SpaceDaily.com - US

Reconstructing Cassini's Plunge into Saturn

Pasadena CA Oct 17, 2017 As NASA's Cassini spacecraft made its fateful dive into the upper atmosphere of Saturn on Sept. 15, the spacecraft was live-streaming data from eight of its science instruments, along with readings from a variety of engineering systems. While analysis of science data from the final plunge will take ...

- SpaceDaily.com - US

Need for speed makes genome editing efficient, if not better

Researchers have developed a computational model to quantify the mechanism by which CRISPR-Cas9 proteins find their genome-editing targets.

- ScienceDaily - US

Can Zuma untie Gordian knot after failing to quash corruption charges?

South Africa's President Jacob Zuma's loss in the Appeals Court forms part of three milestones in his recent history dominated by corruption, unethical conduct and a knack to avoid criminal charges.

- The Conversation - UK

Univision goes dark for Verizon's cable customers

Univision's channels have gone dark for Verizon's 4.7 million Fios cable customers because of a contract dispute.

- PhysOrg - NL

Wearables to boost security of voice-based log-in

A security-token necklace, ear buds or eyeglasses developed at the University of Michigan could eliminate vulnerabilities in voice authentication—the practice of logging in to a device or service with your voice alone.

- PhysOrg - NL

New fires break out in California as wine country fires dim

As crews gained on the wildfires in California wine country, new blazes broke out in other parts of the state, including a fire in the mountains above Los Angeles that threatened a historic observatory Tuesday and more flames in the Santa Cruz mountains.

- PhysOrg - NL

Loops of liquid metal can improve future fusion power plants, scientists say

Researchers have proposed an innovative design to improve the ability of future fusion power plants to generate safe, clean and abundant energy in a steady state, or constant, manner. The design uses loops of liquid lithium to clean and recycle the tritium, the radioactive hydrogen isotope that fuels fusion reactions, and ...

- ScienceDaily - US

US nuke waste repository in New Mexico will get more space

Workers are expected to begin mining operations at the U.S. nuclear waste dump in New Mexico for the first time in three years following a radiation release that contaminated part of the underground repository, the Energy Department said Tuesday.

- PhysOrg - NL

Heavy elements in neutron star mergers detected

Darmstadt, Germany Oct 17, 2017 On October 16 a team of scientists, including members from the LIGO and Virgo collaborations and several astronomical groups, announced the detection of both gravitational and electromagnetic waves, originating from the merger of two neutron stars. These mergers have been speculated as the ...

- SpaceDaily.com - US

Let's get this straight, habitat loss is the number-one threat to Australia's species

The outgoing Threatened Species Commissioner has downplayed the importance of land clearing as a threat to Australia's plants and animals. But it's the biggest threat, and magnifies the others too.

- The Conversation - UK

Household savings figures in Turnbull's energy policy look rubbery

The big questions about Malcolm Turnbull's energy policy will be, for consumers, what it would mean for their bills and, for business, how confident it can be that the approach would hold if Bill Shorten…

- The Conversation - UK

Scientists determine source of world's largest mud eruption

More than 11 years after the Lusi mud volcano first erupted on the Indonesian island of Java, researchers may have figured out why the mudflows haven't stopped: deep underground, Lusi is connected to a nearby volcanic system.

- ScienceDaily - US

Loops of liquid metal can improve future fusion power plants, scientists say

Researchers led by the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory have proposed an innovative design to improve the ability of future fusion power plants to generate safe, clean and abundant energy in a steady state, or constant, manner. The design uses loops of liquid lithium to clean and recycle the ...

- PhysOrg - NL

Filling the early universe with knots can explain why the world is three-dimensional

Nashville TN Oct 17, 2017 The next time you come across a knotted jumble of rope or wire or yarn, ponder this: The natural tendency for things to tangle may help explain the three-dimensional nature of the universe and how it formed. An international team of physicists has developed an out-of-the-box theory which proposes ...

- SpaceDaily.com - US